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THE INFLUENCE OF TYPE AND DEGREE OF EMOTION EXPRESSED BY VICTIM AND RELATIONSHIP TYPE BETWEEN VICTIM AND SUPPORT PROVIDER ON THE PROVISION OF SOCIAL SUPPORT

Cooper, Katrina L. (2007) THE INFLUENCE OF TYPE AND DEGREE OF EMOTION EXPRESSED BY VICTIM AND RELATIONSHIP TYPE BETWEEN VICTIM AND SUPPORT PROVIDER ON THE PROVISION OF SOCIAL SUPPORT. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    Research on social support has produced conflicting results concerning the role that emotional expression by the victim plays in the process. The current study sought to clarify the role played by the type and intensity of the emotion displayed by the victim, and the relationship type desired by the potential support provider. Participants interacted with confederates displaying low, medium or high levels of either sadness or anger after they had been induced to desire either a communal or exchange relationship. Emotion type and relationship type influenced a number of support variables. The effects of emotional intensity were more ambiguous. Results suggest that a more holistic view of support processes is needed to more fully understand social support.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Committee ChairGreenberg, Martingreenber@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberFeeney, Brookebfeeney@andrew.cmu.edu
    Committee MemberMoreland, Richardcslewis@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberKlein, Williamwmklein@pitt.edu
    Title: THE INFLUENCE OF TYPE AND DEGREE OF EMOTION EXPRESSED BY VICTIM AND RELATIONSHIP TYPE BETWEEN VICTIM AND SUPPORT PROVIDER ON THE PROVISION OF SOCIAL SUPPORT
    Status: Unpublished
    Abstract: Research on social support has produced conflicting results concerning the role that emotional expression by the victim plays in the process. The current study sought to clarify the role played by the type and intensity of the emotion displayed by the victim, and the relationship type desired by the potential support provider. Participants interacted with confederates displaying low, medium or high levels of either sadness or anger after they had been induced to desire either a communal or exchange relationship. Emotion type and relationship type influenced a number of support variables. The effects of emotional intensity were more ambiguous. Results suggest that a more holistic view of support processes is needed to more fully understand social support.
    Date: 30 January 2007
    Date Type: Completion
    Defense Date: 29 November 2006
    Approval Date: 30 January 2007
    Submission Date: 05 December 2006
    Access Restriction: No restriction; The work is available for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
    URN: etd-12052006-171116
    Uncontrolled Keywords: social support; communal; relationships; emotion t
    Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Psychology
    Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2011 15:08
    Last Modified: 21 May 2012 11:44
    Other ID: http://etd.library.pitt.edu/ETD/available/etd-12052006-171116/, etd-12052006-171116

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