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WRIST BIOMECHANICS AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC MEASURES OF THE MEDIAN NERVE DURING COMPUTER KEYBOARDING

Toosi, Kevin K (2012) WRIST BIOMECHANICS AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC MEASURES OF THE MEDIAN NERVE DURING COMPUTER KEYBOARDING. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    Keyboarding is a highly repetitive daily task and has been linked to musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity. However, the effect of keyboarding on median nerve injuries is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether continuous keyboarding can cause acute changes in the median nerve and whether these changes are correlated with wrist biomechanics during keyboarding. Ultrasound images of the median nerve from forty healthy volunteers were captured at the levels of the pisiform and distal radius prior to and following a prolonged keyboarding task (i.e., one hour of continuous keyboarding). Images were analyzed by a blinded investigator to quantify the median nerve characteristics. Changes in the median nerve ultrasonographic measures as a result of continuous keyboarding task were evaluated and compared to the hand and wrist biomechanical variables, which were collected simultaneously. Cross-sectional areas at the pisiform level were significantly larger in both dominant and non-dominant hands following the keyboarding task. Swelling ratio was also significantly greater in both hands after 30 and 60 minutes of keyboarding when compared to the baseline measures. Both cross-sectional area and swelling ratio, however, decreased after 30 minutes of manual rest. These acute changes were positively correlated to biomechanical variables of wrist, including wrist flexion and tendon travel. We were able to detect acute changes in the median nerve ultrasound characteristics following one hour of computer keyboarding. These changes were significantly correlated to the wrist biomechanics. The findings suggest that keyboarding has an impact on the median nerve. Further studies are required to understand this relationship, which would provide insight into the pathophysiology of median neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmailORCID
    Thesis AdvisorBoninger, Michael Lboninger@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberRedfern, Mark Smredfern@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberBaker, Nancy Anab36@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberCham, Rakiercham@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberMahboobin, Arasharm19@pitt.edu
    Title: WRIST BIOMECHANICS AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC MEASURES OF THE MEDIAN NERVE DURING COMPUTER KEYBOARDING
    Status: Published
    Abstract: Keyboarding is a highly repetitive daily task and has been linked to musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity. However, the effect of keyboarding on median nerve injuries is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine whether continuous keyboarding can cause acute changes in the median nerve and whether these changes are correlated with wrist biomechanics during keyboarding. Ultrasound images of the median nerve from forty healthy volunteers were captured at the levels of the pisiform and distal radius prior to and following a prolonged keyboarding task (i.e., one hour of continuous keyboarding). Images were analyzed by a blinded investigator to quantify the median nerve characteristics. Changes in the median nerve ultrasonographic measures as a result of continuous keyboarding task were evaluated and compared to the hand and wrist biomechanical variables, which were collected simultaneously. Cross-sectional areas at the pisiform level were significantly larger in both dominant and non-dominant hands following the keyboarding task. Swelling ratio was also significantly greater in both hands after 30 and 60 minutes of keyboarding when compared to the baseline measures. Both cross-sectional area and swelling ratio, however, decreased after 30 minutes of manual rest. These acute changes were positively correlated to biomechanical variables of wrist, including wrist flexion and tendon travel. We were able to detect acute changes in the median nerve ultrasound characteristics following one hour of computer keyboarding. These changes were significantly correlated to the wrist biomechanics. The findings suggest that keyboarding has an impact on the median nerve. Further studies are required to understand this relationship, which would provide insight into the pathophysiology of median neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome.
    Date: 02 February 2012
    Date Type: Publication
    Defense Date: 14 July 2011
    Approval Date: 02 February 2012
    Submission Date: 01 December 2011
    Release Date: 02 February 2012
    Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
    Patent pending: No
    Number of Pages: 181
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Biomechanics; Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; Median Nerve; Ultrasonography; Ultrasound; Keyboarding
    Schools and Programs: Swanson School of Engineering > Bioengineering
    Date Deposited: 02 Feb 2012 10:31
    Last Modified: 16 Jul 2014 17:03

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