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LIVING IN POVERTY: IMPLICATIONS FOR WORK ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIORS

Stiehl, Emily LIVING IN POVERTY: IMPLICATIONS FOR WORK ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIORS. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    Poverty is a powerful context that can affect individuals psychologically and socially, as well as financially. My work aims to introduce a discussion of poverty into the work domain, specifically examining how it can be defined at work, and how it affects work attitudes and behaviors. I present two papers that propose and test a theory of poverty's multifaceted effects on work outcomes (e.g., discretionary behaviors, job attachment, and career development) through a set of mediating mechanisms (e.g., self-efficacy, negative affectivity, and the diversity of social resources).


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Committee ChairLeana, Carrieleana@pitt.edu
    Committee CoChairMittal, Vikasvmittal@rice.edu
    Committee MemberPil, Fritsfritspil@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberMoreland, Richard
    Committee MemberRousseau, Denise
    Title: LIVING IN POVERTY: IMPLICATIONS FOR WORK ATTITUDES AND BEHAVIORS
    Status: Published
    Abstract: Poverty is a powerful context that can affect individuals psychologically and socially, as well as financially. My work aims to introduce a discussion of poverty into the work domain, specifically examining how it can be defined at work, and how it affects work attitudes and behaviors. I present two papers that propose and test a theory of poverty's multifaceted effects on work outcomes (e.g., discretionary behaviors, job attachment, and career development) through a set of mediating mechanisms (e.g., self-efficacy, negative affectivity, and the diversity of social resources).
    Defense Date: 18 August 2011
    Approval Date: 06 January 2012
    Submission Date: 06 December 2011
    Release Date: 06 January 2012
    Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
    Patent pending: No
    Number of Pages: 134
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
    Uncontrolled Keywords: poverty; context; self-efficacy; negative affect; extra-role behaviors; social resources
    Schools and Programs: Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business > Business Administration
    Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2012 13:26
    Last Modified: 10 Jan 2012 01:15

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