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ASSOCIATION OF LIPOPROTEIN-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 AND C-REACTIVE PROTEIN WITH MODERATE-TO-VIGOROUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN MIDDLE-AGED WOMEN

Rice, David (2012) ASSOCIATION OF LIPOPROTEIN-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 AND C-REACTIVE PROTEIN WITH MODERATE-TO-VIGOROUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN MIDDLE-AGED WOMEN. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an inflammatory process that is the most common form of cardiovascular diseas(CVD). People who are habitually physically active have comparatively lower levels of certain inflammatory biomarkers. C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered the “gold standard” to assess the relation between physical activity and inflammation. Lipoprotein- associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an inflammatory marker that has been shown to be associated with CHD. However, little is known about what association Lp-PLA2 might have with habitual physical activity. Purpose: The current investigation examined the association between Lp-PLA2 and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). A secondary purpose was to examine the association between CRP and MVPA. Finally, this investigation examined the association between Lp-PLA2 and CRP. Methods: This investigation was a secondary analysis of data that were previously collected as part of the Epidemiologic Study of Health Risk in Women (ESTHER). Seventy-five females (50.2 ± 10 yrs.) were selected for the current investigation and were assigned to either the ACTIVE or INACTIVE group. The ACTIVE group was comprised of those who reported the highest levels of MVPA (≥ 8.93 hours/week) during the previous 12 months. The INACTIVE group comprised participants who reported no MVPA over the previous 12 months. Blood samples from each participant were analyzed for levels of Lp-PLA2 mass, Lp-PLA2 activity and CRP. Results: No significant differences were found between the ACTIVE and INACTIVE groups for mean values of either Lp-PLA2 mass (ACTIVE= 226.4 ± 48.1 ng/ml, INACTIVE=217.6 ± 50.4 ng/ml, p = 0.44) or Lp-PLA2 activity (ACTIVE=133.3 ± 26.4 nmol/min/ml, INACTIVE=136.5 ± 30.5 nmol/min/ml, p = 0.63). CRP values were significantly (p = 0.02) lower in the ACTIVE group as compared to the INACTIVE group. It was found that neither Lp-PLA2 mass nor Lp- PLA2 activity were significantly correlated with CRP values. Conclusions: Based on the current findings, it can be concluded that Lp-PLA2 is not associated with MVPA in heterosexual, middle-aged women. Other inflammatory markers that have been found to be associated both with CHD and PA, such as CRP, IL-6, and TNF- α, should continue to be examined.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Committee ChairRobertson, Robert
    Committee MemberNagle, Elizabeth
    Committee MemberDanielson, Michelle
    Committee MemberOrchard , Trevor
    Title: ASSOCIATION OF LIPOPROTEIN-ASSOCIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 AND C-REACTIVE PROTEIN WITH MODERATE-TO-VIGOROUS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN MIDDLE-AGED WOMEN
    Status: Published
    Abstract: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is an inflammatory process that is the most common form of cardiovascular diseas(CVD). People who are habitually physically active have comparatively lower levels of certain inflammatory biomarkers. C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered the “gold standard” to assess the relation between physical activity and inflammation. Lipoprotein- associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an inflammatory marker that has been shown to be associated with CHD. However, little is known about what association Lp-PLA2 might have with habitual physical activity. Purpose: The current investigation examined the association between Lp-PLA2 and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). A secondary purpose was to examine the association between CRP and MVPA. Finally, this investigation examined the association between Lp-PLA2 and CRP. Methods: This investigation was a secondary analysis of data that were previously collected as part of the Epidemiologic Study of Health Risk in Women (ESTHER). Seventy-five females (50.2 ± 10 yrs.) were selected for the current investigation and were assigned to either the ACTIVE or INACTIVE group. The ACTIVE group was comprised of those who reported the highest levels of MVPA (≥ 8.93 hours/week) during the previous 12 months. The INACTIVE group comprised participants who reported no MVPA over the previous 12 months. Blood samples from each participant were analyzed for levels of Lp-PLA2 mass, Lp-PLA2 activity and CRP. Results: No significant differences were found between the ACTIVE and INACTIVE groups for mean values of either Lp-PLA2 mass (ACTIVE= 226.4 ± 48.1 ng/ml, INACTIVE=217.6 ± 50.4 ng/ml, p = 0.44) or Lp-PLA2 activity (ACTIVE=133.3 ± 26.4 nmol/min/ml, INACTIVE=136.5 ± 30.5 nmol/min/ml, p = 0.63). CRP values were significantly (p = 0.02) lower in the ACTIVE group as compared to the INACTIVE group. It was found that neither Lp-PLA2 mass nor Lp- PLA2 activity were significantly correlated with CRP values. Conclusions: Based on the current findings, it can be concluded that Lp-PLA2 is not associated with MVPA in heterosexual, middle-aged women. Other inflammatory markers that have been found to be associated both with CHD and PA, such as CRP, IL-6, and TNF- α, should continue to be examined.
    Date: 11 January 2012
    Date Type: Publication
    Defense Date: 26 August 2011
    Approval Date: 11 January 2012
    Submission Date: 03 January 2012
    Release Date: 11 January 2012
    Access Restriction: 1 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 1 year.
    Patent pending: No
    Number of Pages: 80
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Inflammation
    Schools and Programs: School of Education > Health and Physical Activity
    Date Deposited: 11 Jan 2012 15:56
    Last Modified: 16 Jul 2014 17:04

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