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THE LINKAGES BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND CHARACTERISTICS OF DONOR CAPITAL FLOW: THE CASE OF MICROFINANCE CAPITAL FLOW IN SIERRA LEONE

Bell, David THE LINKAGES BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND CHARACTERISTICS OF DONOR CAPITAL FLOW: THE CASE OF MICROFINANCE CAPITAL FLOW IN SIERRA LEONE. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Abstract

    Capital, in the form of foreign aid, is a very substantial revenue form for many developing nations. Foreign aid is integral to strategies of nations working to relieve human suffering and achieve a secure, stable world. One of the greatest impediments to foreign aid effectiveness is unpredictability, or capital volatility. At a macro level, capital volatility’s impact in developing nations is multiples of that in the industrialized world. Capital volatility has been shown to substantially impact social welfare costs and both the efficiency and effectiveness of aid. Thus, volatility reduces the value of foreign aid. This investigation explored linkages between organizational behavior and capital volatility by analyzing the promises and disbursement conditions agreed to by donors and microfinance recipient organizations: capital investment deals. Capital volatility is defined as the difference between commitments and disbursements. The examination utilized a case study of a donor collaborative project—Microfinance Institution Technical Assistance Facility in Sierra Leone—the first of over 20 created to develop an inclusive, pro-poor financial sector by assisting microfinance institutions. Disbursement conditions and bureaucracy alone are not sufficient explanations of capital volatility. A deeper analysis revealed the role of each party’s perceptions and expectations in their respective understandings of a performance based agreement that defines the deal as a relationship, not just a legal document. These understandings are the bases of each party’s decisions and actions, often with ethical implications and consequences. This project has produced a theoretical lens – the Capitalflow Bureaucratic Triad - to understand this complexity and plan future volatility reducing strategies.


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    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmail
    Committee MemberHaley, Leonlhaley@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberKearns, Kevinkkearns@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberVanterpool, Maureenmovanter@geneva.edu
    Committee MemberMartin, Rodneyrmartin@wnj.com
    Committee ChairWhite, Harveyhlw@pitt.edu
    Title: THE LINKAGES BETWEEN ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND CHARACTERISTICS OF DONOR CAPITAL FLOW: THE CASE OF MICROFINANCE CAPITAL FLOW IN SIERRA LEONE
    Status: Published
    Abstract: Capital, in the form of foreign aid, is a very substantial revenue form for many developing nations. Foreign aid is integral to strategies of nations working to relieve human suffering and achieve a secure, stable world. One of the greatest impediments to foreign aid effectiveness is unpredictability, or capital volatility. At a macro level, capital volatility’s impact in developing nations is multiples of that in the industrialized world. Capital volatility has been shown to substantially impact social welfare costs and both the efficiency and effectiveness of aid. Thus, volatility reduces the value of foreign aid. This investigation explored linkages between organizational behavior and capital volatility by analyzing the promises and disbursement conditions agreed to by donors and microfinance recipient organizations: capital investment deals. Capital volatility is defined as the difference between commitments and disbursements. The examination utilized a case study of a donor collaborative project—Microfinance Institution Technical Assistance Facility in Sierra Leone—the first of over 20 created to develop an inclusive, pro-poor financial sector by assisting microfinance institutions. Disbursement conditions and bureaucracy alone are not sufficient explanations of capital volatility. A deeper analysis revealed the role of each party’s perceptions and expectations in their respective understandings of a performance based agreement that defines the deal as a relationship, not just a legal document. These understandings are the bases of each party’s decisions and actions, often with ethical implications and consequences. This project has produced a theoretical lens – the Capitalflow Bureaucratic Triad - to understand this complexity and plan future volatility reducing strategies.
    Defense Date: 19 September 2011
    Approval Date: 30 January 2012
    Submission Date: 09 January 2012
    Release Date: 30 January 2012
    Access Restriction: 1 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 1 year.
    Patent pending: No
    Number of Pages: 301
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Microfinance, Capital Volatility, Bureaucracy, Grounded Theory, Accountability
    Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public and International Affairs > Public and International Affairs
    Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2012 12:00
    Last Modified: 30 Jan 2013 01:15

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