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Wildlife Managers: Boundary Workers Between the Human Community and the Wilderness

Lawson, Helene M. (2002) Wildlife Managers: Boundary Workers Between the Human Community and the Wilderness. International Review of Modern Sociology, 30 (1). pp. 46-65. ISSN 0970-4841

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Official URL: http://www.yorku.ca/irjs/Archives/R20/R203.pdf

Abstract

This research focuses on wildlife managers, such as game wardens and land management supervisors, who as government agents,manage the boundary between humans and the wilderness while at the same time holding a personal stake in controlling the wilderness areas of the United States. Looking through the eyes of these managers, the paper examines their childhood socialization and education to the belief that as wilderness stewards they should govern from a perspective that maximizes their own personal enjoyment of the wilderness, including the tradition of hunting. Other hunters and animal-rights advocates contest methods of control exercised by wildlife managers. This paper examines wildlife managers' solidarity amid conflict, their motivations for choosing their work and the important role they play in the central struggle over the interpretation of wilderness and life-and-death environmental issues, such as the regulation of animal population levels. It demonstrates how their solidarity as a work group mitigates the conflicts they face at the price of marrowing their perspective on non-human animals.


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Item Type: Article
Title: Wildlife Managers: Boundary Workers Between the Human Community and the Wilderness
Status: Published
Abstract: This research focuses on wildlife managers, such as game wardens and land management supervisors, who as government agents,manage the boundary between humans and the wilderness while at the same time holding a personal stake in controlling the wilderness areas of the United States. Looking through the eyes of these managers, the paper examines their childhood socialization and education to the belief that as wilderness stewards they should govern from a perspective that maximizes their own personal enjoyment of the wilderness, including the tradition of hunting. Other hunters and animal-rights advocates contest methods of control exercised by wildlife managers. This paper examines wildlife managers' solidarity amid conflict, their motivations for choosing their work and the important role they play in the central struggle over the interpretation of wilderness and life-and-death environmental issues, such as the regulation of animal population levels. It demonstrates how their solidarity as a work group mitigates the conflicts they face at the price of marrowing their perspective on non-human animals.
Date: 2002
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Patent pending: No
Journal or Publication Title: International Review of Modern Sociology
Volume: 30
Number: 1
Publisher: York University, CANADA
Page Range: pp. 46-65
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 0970-4841
Official URL: http://www.yorku.ca/irjs/Archives/R20/R203.pdf
Related URLs:
Schools and Programs: University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
Date Deposited: 13 Feb 2012 11:36
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2012 11:36

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