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Effects of a closed tracheal suction system on ventilatory and cardiovascular parameters.

Harshbarger, SA and Hoffman, LA and Zullo, TG and Pinsky, MR (1992) Effects of a closed tracheal suction system on ventilatory and cardiovascular parameters. American journal of critical care : an official publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, 1 (3). 57 - 61. ISSN 1062-3264

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients ventilated in the assist-control mode experienced a change in oxygenation, respiratory rate, inspiratory:expiratory ratio, heart rate, blood pressure or acid-base balance when suctioned with a closed tracheal suction system. DESIGN: A quasi-experimental, within-subject, repeated-measures design was used. SUBJECTS: 18 patients ventilated on a fraction of inspired oxygen of 0.47 +/- 0.17 and 2.3 +/- 5.0 cm H2O positive end-expiratory pressure. INTERVENTIONS: Two suction passes were performed, with measurements at baseline, immediately after the first suction pass, immediately before the second suction pass, immediately after the second suction pass, 2 minutes after the second suction pass and 5 minutes after the second suction pass. No hyperoxygenation was used. RESULTS: Significant differences were seen over time for arterial oxygen saturation, respiratory rate and inspiratory:expiratory ratio. Arterial oxygen saturation decreased to less than 90% in four subjects (range 88% to 89%), with a maximum fall of 9%. No significant differences were seen for heart rate, blood pressure, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, time to nadir (lowest arterial oxygen saturation) or recovery time. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects ventilated in the assist-control mode and suctioned with a closed tracheal suction system did not experience significant changes in cardiovascular or acid-base parameters when suctioned without hyperoxygenation. Although most subjects did not become desaturated, four subjects experienced desaturation at one or more intervals. To prevent desaturation, hyperoxygenation should be used before and after suctioning with a closed tracheal suction system.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Harshbarger, SA
Hoffman, LAlhof@pitt.eduLHOF
Zullo, TG
Pinsky, MRpinsky@pitt.eduPINSKY
Date: 1 November 1992
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: American journal of critical care : an official publication, American Association of Critical-Care Nurses
Volume: 1
Number: 3
Page Range: 57 - 61
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Critical Care Medicine
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1062-3264
PubMed ID: 1307908
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2012 20:06
Last Modified: 03 Feb 2019 06:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/11111

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