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Increases in peripheral oxygen demand affect blood flow distribution in hemorrhaged dogs

Romand, JA and Attewell, JV and Pinsky, MR (1996) Increases in peripheral oxygen demand affect blood flow distribution in hemorrhaged dogs. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 153 (1). 203 - 210. ISSN 1073-449X

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Abstract

Blood flow redistribution away from the gastrointestinal tract and kidney occurs during progressive hemorrhage and stress. However, the effects of remote increases in oxygen demand on a circulation with limited ability to respond have not been described. Thus, we observed the effect of remote increases in oxygen demand on splanchnic and renal blood flow in hemorrhaged dogs. Nine α-chloralose-anesthetized, splenectomized dogs were subjected to hemorrhage of 10 ml/kg followed by an additional 5 ml/kg. At each of these two stages, bilateral femoral nerve stimulation was used to increase lower extremity oxygen demand while lower extremity, splanchnic, renal blood flows and arteriovenous oxygen content differences were monitored. Hemorrhage was associated with redistribution of blood flow away from the lower extremities and kidneys and increasing the oxygen extraction ratio of the splanchnic bed. Lower extremity stimulation increased whole-body oxygen consumption (7.3 ± 2.7 to 11.4 ± 4.5 ml O2/min/kg, p < 0.01). If arterial pressure remained stable during stimulation (> 90% of baseline value, n = 9), visceral organ blood flow did not change. However, when blood pressure decreased (< 70% of baseline, n = 8), splanchnic (226.3 ± 143.5 to 140.9 ± 126.4 ml/min, p < 0.01) and renal (59.6 ± 30.2 to 28.5 ± 26.0 ml/min, p < 0.01) blood flow also decreased. Thus, in the anesthetized, hemorrhaged dog, increased peripheral oxygen demand results in further redistribution of blood flow away from the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys only when there is a concurrent decrease in blood pressure.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Romand, JA
Attewell, JV
Pinsky, MRpinsky@pitt.eduPINSKY
Date: 1 January 1996
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume: 153
Number: 1
Page Range: 203 - 210
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1164/ajrccm.153.1.8542117
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Critical Care Medicine
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1073-449X
PubMed ID: 8542117
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2012 17:33
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2019 15:57
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/11221

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