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Cognitive and behavioral predictors of light therapy use

UNSPECIFIED (2012) Cognitive and behavioral predictors of light therapy use. PLoS ONE, 7 (6).

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Abstract

Objective: Although light therapy is effective in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and other mood disorders, only 53-79% of individuals with SAD meet remission criteria after light therapy. Perhaps more importantly, only 12-41% of individuals with SAD continue to use the treatment even after a previous winter of successful treatment. Method: Participants completed surveys regarding (1) social, cognitive, and behavioral variables used to evaluate treatment adherence for other health-related issues, expectations and credibility of light therapy, (2) a depression symptoms scale, and (3) self-reported light therapy use. Results: Individuals age 18 or older responded (n = 40), all reporting having been diagnosed with a mood disorder for which light therapy is indicated. Social support and self-efficacy scores were predictive of light therapy use (p's<.05). Conclusion: The findings suggest that testing social support and self-efficacy in a diagnosed patient population may identify factors related to the decision to use light therapy. Treatments that impact social support and self-efficacy may improve treatment response to light therapy in SAD. © 2012 Roecklein et al.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorGarcía, Antonio VerdejoUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 13 June 2012
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 7
Number: 6
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039275
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Psychology
Refereed: Yes
PubMed Central ID: PMC3374783
PubMed ID: 22720089
Date Deposited: 11 Jul 2012 18:10
Last Modified: 05 Jan 2019 15:58
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/12706

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