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Integrating velocity measurements in a reservoir rock sample from the SACROC unit with an AVO proxy for subsurface supercritical CO2

Harbert, William and Mur, Alan and Soong, Yee and McLendon, T. Robert and Haljasmaa, Igor V. and Purcell, Christopher (2010) Integrating velocity measurements in a reservoir rock sample from the SACROC unit with an AVO proxy for subsurface supercritical CO2. The Leading Edge (Tulsa), 29 (2). pp. 192-195. ISSN 1070-485X

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DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1190/1.3304823

Abstract

One of the most promising methods proposed to mitigate global CO2 and one that is useful in enhanced oil recovery is carbon sequestration, a process in which CO2 is pressurized and injected into geologic formations. A technical challenge surrounding the geologic sequestration of CO2 is tracking the movement of the fluids pumped underground. Monitoring, verification, and accounting activities related to CO2 storage are important for assuring that any sequestered CO2 does not escape to the surface and can be considerably aided by reflection seismic-based detection methods. Through the use of lab-scale velocity measurements under in-situ conditions, combined with multiple 3D reflection seismic surveys, we hope to effectively track the movements of CO2 after injection.


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Item Type: Article
Title: Integrating velocity measurements in a reservoir rock sample from the SACROC unit with an AVO proxy for subsurface supercritical CO2
Status: Published
Abstract: One of the most promising methods proposed to mitigate global CO2 and one that is useful in enhanced oil recovery is carbon sequestration, a process in which CO2 is pressurized and injected into geologic formations. A technical challenge surrounding the geologic sequestration of CO2 is tracking the movement of the fluids pumped underground. Monitoring, verification, and accounting activities related to CO2 storage are important for assuring that any sequestered CO2 does not escape to the surface and can be considerably aided by reflection seismic-based detection methods. Through the use of lab-scale velocity measurements under in-situ conditions, combined with multiple 3D reflection seismic surveys, we hope to effectively track the movements of CO2 after injection.
Date: 2010
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; The work is available for access worldwide immediately.
Patent pending: No
Journal or Publication Title: The Leading Edge (Tulsa)
Volume: 29
Number: 2
Publisher: Society of Exploration Geophysicists
Page Range: pp. 192-195
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1190/1.3304823
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1070-485X
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Geology and Planetary Science
Date Deposited: 26 Aug 2012 09:29
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2012 09:29

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