Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Trajectories of Childhood Weight Gain: The Relative Importance of Local Environment versus Individual Social and Early Life Factors

Carter, MA and Dubois, L and Tremblay, MS and Taljaard, M and Jones, BL (2012) Trajectories of Childhood Weight Gain: The Relative Importance of Local Environment versus Individual Social and Early Life Factors. PLoS ONE, 7 (10).

[img]
Preview
PDF
Published Version
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (413kB) | Preview
[img] Plain Text (licence)
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (1kB)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the association between local environmental factors with child weight status in a longitudinal study, using a semi-parametric, group-based method, while also considering social and early life factors. Methods: Standardized, directly measured BMI from 4-10 y of age, and group-based trajectory modeling (PROC TRAJ) were used to estimate developmental trajectories of weight change in a Québec birth cohort (n = 1,566). Associations between the weight trajectories and living location, social cohesion, disorder, and material and social deprivation were estimated after controlling for social and early life factors. Results: Four weight trajectory groups were estimated: low-increasing (9.7%); low-medium, accelerating (36.2%); medium-high, increasing (43.0%); and high-stable (11.1%). In the low-increasing and medium-high trajectory groups, living in a semi-urban area was inversely related to weight, while living in a rural area was positively related to weight in the high-stable group. Disorder was inversely related to weight in the low-increasing group only. Other important risk factors for high-stable weight included obesity status of the mother, smoking during pregnancy, and overeating behaviors. Conclusions: In this study, associations between local environment factors and weight differed by trajectory group. Early life factors appear to play a more consistent role in weight status. Further work is needed to determine the influence of place on child weight. © 2012 Carter et al.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Carter, MA
Dubois, L
Tremblay, MS
Taljaard, M
Jones, BL
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorNewton, Robert L.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Centers: Other Centers, Institutes, or Units > Center for Research on Health Care
Date: 15 October 2012
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 7
Number: 10
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047065
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 15 Nov 2012 14:54
Last Modified: 20 Dec 2018 00:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/16045

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics

Altmetric.com


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item