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Surveillance of Demographic Characteristics and Self-Reported Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2009-2010

Hagerman, Eleanor/K (2012) Surveillance of Demographic Characteristics and Self-Reported Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, 2009-2010. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Objectives: First, to analyze the prevalence of myocardial infarctions, coronary heart disease, and stroke in Allegheny County in 2002-2010 and compare these estimates in relation to those of Pennsylvania state and nationwide. Second, to obtain the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors among respondents with and without cardiovascular disease in Allegheny County for 2009-2010. Third, to detect differences in cardiovascular disease risk factor prevalence between males and females. Study Design: Data collected from the 5,442 respondents making up the Allegheny County Health Survey, a telephone survey modeled after the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS), was analyzed. Methods: Prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors were obtained from chi-square analysis with corresponding confidence intervals and p-values. Results: Stroke prevalence was 1% higher in Allegheny County compared to Pennsylvania and nationwide data from 2002-2010. For the 2009-2010 year, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Allegheny County was 10%. The majority of adults with cardiovascular disease were older than 65 years of age (54%), had never obtained a college degree (84%), and earned less than $50,000 in annual income (76%). Overweight and obese adults made up 72% of all adults with cardiovascular disease, 32% had diabetes, 47% were heavy drinkers, 69% had hypertension, and 62% had high cholesterol. Males and females with cardiovascular disease had comparable diabetes (68% in females and 69% in males), high cholesterol (40% in females and 37% in males), and health care access (89% in females and 90% in males). Black females (17%) were more than twice as likely to have cardiovascular disease than black males (8%). More females with cardiovascular disease had never smoked before compared to males (39% versus 26%), were more likely to have hypertension (36% versus 27%), and were less likely to take aspirin daily or every other day (68% versus 77%). Conclusions: Cardiovascular disease is higher in Allegheny County than nationwide and is of public health significance. Public health interventions should be targeted to decrease traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors such as obesity, high cholesterol, and hypertension. However, gender-specific interventions should also be considered.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Hagerman, Eleanor/K
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairEvans, Rhobert/WEvansR@edc.pitt.eduRWE2UNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberBrooks, Maria Mmbrooks@pitt.eduMBROOKSUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberHutcheson, Deborah/Adhutches@pitt.eduDHUTCHESUNSPECIFIED
Date: 7 January 2012
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: No
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2013 17:15
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2019 12:56
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/17091

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