Pitt Logo LinkContact Us

Chikungunya Virus Glycoproteins Mediate Viral Entry and Cellular Fusion

Rinchuse, Derek (2013) Chikungunya Virus Glycoproteins Mediate Viral Entry and Cellular Fusion. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh.

[img] PDF - Primary Text
Restricted to University of Pittsburgh users only until December 2017.

Download (1767Kb) | Request a copy

    Abstract

    The Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has currently been identified in over 40 countries and in 2008 was listed as a US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) category C priority pathogen. Outbreaks of the virus have been documented as early as 1779 and frequent outbreaks have been reported through 1960-2003, most notably in Reunion Island, a French overseas department in the Indian Ocean. Out of a total population of 785,000 in Reunion Island, 300,000 cases were reported including a total of 237 deaths. Numerous aspects of the viral life cycle are unknown, with no current vaccine the implementation of more research and dissemination of more knowledge is of great public health importance. A CHIKV construct was synthesized by Genewiz, containing CHIKV structural proteins in pcDNA 3.1. This construct was used to create CHIKV pseudo-viral particles with a luciferase based reporter. The pseudo-virus was used to survey many cell lines for permissivity to infection. This construct was also used to create 3 other constructs containing CHIKV E1, E2, and E3 individually. These constructs were used individually and in combination with each other to create pseudo-viruses for cellular infection. The cell-cell fusion capabilities of the full CHIKV construct along with the individual envelope proteins were also tested in a Cre-Lox system.


    Share

    Citation/Export:
    Social Networking:

    Details

    Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
    ETD Committee:
    ETD Committee TypeCommittee MemberEmailORCID
    Thesis AdvisorWang, Tianyitywang@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberHartman, Amyhartman2@pitt.edu
    Committee MemberKlimstra, Williamklimstra@pitt.edu
    Title: Chikungunya Virus Glycoproteins Mediate Viral Entry and Cellular Fusion
    Status: Published
    Abstract: The Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has currently been identified in over 40 countries and in 2008 was listed as a US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) category C priority pathogen. Outbreaks of the virus have been documented as early as 1779 and frequent outbreaks have been reported through 1960-2003, most notably in Reunion Island, a French overseas department in the Indian Ocean. Out of a total population of 785,000 in Reunion Island, 300,000 cases were reported including a total of 237 deaths. Numerous aspects of the viral life cycle are unknown, with no current vaccine the implementation of more research and dissemination of more knowledge is of great public health importance. A CHIKV construct was synthesized by Genewiz, containing CHIKV structural proteins in pcDNA 3.1. This construct was used to create CHIKV pseudo-viral particles with a luciferase based reporter. The pseudo-virus was used to survey many cell lines for permissivity to infection. This construct was also used to create 3 other constructs containing CHIKV E1, E2, and E3 individually. These constructs were used individually and in combination with each other to create pseudo-viruses for cellular infection. The cell-cell fusion capabilities of the full CHIKV construct along with the individual envelope proteins were also tested in a Cre-Lox system.
    Date: 29 January 2013
    Date Type: Publication
    Defense Date: 31 October 2012
    Approval Date: 29 January 2013
    Submission Date: 24 January 2013
    Release Date: 29 January 2013
    Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
    Patent pending: No
    Number of Pages: 64
    Institution: University of Pittsburgh
    Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
    Refereed: Yes
    Degree: MS - Master of Science
    Uncontrolled Keywords: Chikungunya Virus
    Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
    Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2013 17:16
    Last Modified: 16 Jul 2014 17:10

    Actions (login required)

    View Item

    Document Downloads