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The economic burden of cutaneous leishmaniasis and HIV co-infection in Brazil and potential impact of new drug therapies

Kruchten, Stephanie (2013) The economic burden of cutaneous leishmaniasis and HIV co-infection in Brazil and potential impact of new drug therapies. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Co-infection of HIV and cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), an opportunistic disease among those with compromised immune systems, has emerged as an important public health concern in Brazil, due to an increase in the incidence of both infections. Pentavalent antimonials, amphotericin B, and miltefosine are all used for CL treatment among HIV positive individuals; however the utilized dosages vary between medical professionals and no designated treatment regimen for co-infected individuals exists. Due to the limited information available on the co-infection of these diseases, two Markov decision analytic computer models were created to evaluate the additional cost of CL in those co-infected with HIV when using currently available treatments and when a theoretical new treatment is used to treat CL/HIV co-infection. Results indicated that the least expensive lifetime cost per co-infection case is 14.4 times greater ($1,345) than the most expensive single infection case ($93). When comparing the current treatment options to the different scenarios of a theoretical new treatment, it is clear that focusing on new drug development effective for treating CL patients co-infected with HIV would provide considerable benefits. If CL incidence and the likelihood of CL/HIV co-infection continue to rise in Brazil, the total economic burden of CL due to co-infection (currently estimated between $0.2-6.8 million) will likely continue to increase, indicating a further need for research and development efforts for a safe effective drug to treat CL among those co-infected with HIV.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Kruchten, Stephaniesdk33@pitt.eduSDK33
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairGlynn, Nancyglynnn@edc.pitt.eduEPIDNWGUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberLee, Bruce Ybyl1@pitt.eduBYL1UNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberFrank, Lindafrankie@pitt.eduFRANKIEUNSPECIFIED
Date: April 2013
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 06 May 2015 15:32
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 13:58
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/18435

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