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Disparities in substance abuse in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals: is homophobia the driving force?

Novak, Victoria (2013) Disparities in substance abuse in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals: is homophobia the driving force? Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

It has been suggested that members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population are at an increased risk for alcohol and/or substance abuse problems compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Alcohol and substance abuse is a significant public health problem and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including liver and other cancers, cirrhosis, cardiovascular disease, brain damage, high blood pressure, and depression. Homophobia and its negative effects on LGBT individuals is a suggested reason for this health disparity and is a relevant public health issue. Internalizing homophobia has been linked to increased depression, anxiety, and stress, which can in turn increase one’s risk for alcohol and/or substance abuse. This cycle exacerbates the disparity between LGBT and heterosexual individuals and requires further research from public health officials. Contained in this essay is a review of the literature focused on the effects of homophobia on substance abuse in LGBT individuals. Of the studies reviewed, the results were mixed. Many studies found a significant positive relationship between homophobia and substance abuse while some found a significant inverse relationship. A few however, found no relationship between the two. Regardless, the proposed health disparity among LGBT individuals is an issue of public health significance that merits attention.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Novak, Victoria
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairBarinas-Mitchell, Emmabarinas@edc.pitt.eduEJB4UNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberFriedman, Markmsf11@pitt.eduMSF11UNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberMarkovic, Ninaninam@pitt.eduNINAMUNSPECIFIED
Date: 15 April 2013
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 06 May 2015 15:14
Last Modified: 03 Apr 2019 14:56
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/18584

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