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HGF Mediates the Anti-inflammatory Effects of PRP on Injured Tendons

Zhang, J and Middleton, KK and Fu, FH and Im, HJ and Wang, JHC (2013) HGF Mediates the Anti-inflammatory Effects of PRP on Injured Tendons. PLoS ONE, 8 (6).

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Abstract

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2. © 2013 Zhang et al.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Zhang, Jjianying@pitt.eduJIANYING
Middleton, KK
Fu, FHffu@pitt.eduFFU
Im, HJ
Wang, JHCwanghc@pitt.eduWANGHC
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorScavone, CristoforoUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 28 June 2013
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 8
Number: 6
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0067303
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Orthopaedic Surgery
Swanson School of Engineering > Bioengineering
Swanson School of Engineering > Materials Science and Engineering
Swanson School of Engineering > Mechanical Engineering
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 15 Jul 2013 20:18
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2019 16:58
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/19202

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