Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Apprendre des massacres: emotions et nation dans la littérature du Moyen-âge et de la Renaissance

Morand Métivier, Charles-Louis (2013) Apprendre des massacres: emotions et nation dans la littérature du Moyen-âge et de la Renaissance. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Primary Text

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

This dissertation examines the literary representations of massacres from the late fourteenth to the sixteenth century as challenging accepted notions of nationhood and kingship, recreating the nation as an emotional community that transcends traditional ideas of class, rank or wealth. The diachronic approach of this dissertation covers texts written over a period of two hundred years that were written in reaction to three particular massacres: the Battle of Nicopolis (September 25th, 1396), the Battle of Agincourt (October 25th, 1415), and the events of the First French War of Religion (1561-1563).
The main theoretical framework of this dissertation is the idea of emotional communities developed by Barbara Rosenwein. She demonstrates that numerous emotional communities coexisted during the same period, some dominating political and social discourses, but she does not focus on the nation as an emotional community. I use the idea of emotional communities to study how massacres created the possibility for an emotional approach to the study of the nation as an assemblage of communities that redefines itself after a major defeat. I study these communities not only as isolated groups, but also as integrated parts of the nation. The emotional charge following the massacres that created these communities puts them at the center of the new image of France developed in my works, which redefines the French nation as a community of communities and the king as its emotional leader. Through close readings of Philippe de Mézieres’s Epitre lamentable et consolatoire (1397), Christine de Pizan’s Epitre de la prison de vie humaine (1418), Alain Chartier’s Livre des quatre dames (1418), the anonymous Tragédie du sac de Cabrières (1545), and Pierre de Ronsard’s Discours (1562-1565), I demonstrate how the early modern nation built itself following moments of crisis, with emotions as the medium of its creation, and with the king as the emotional cement between its different components.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Morand Métivier, Charles-Louisclmorandmetivier@gmail.com
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee CoChairReeser, Todd Wreeser@pitt.eduREESER
Committee CoChairBlumenfeld-Kosinski, Renaterenate@pitt.eduRENATE
Committee MemberHogg, Chloe Ahoggca@pitt.eduHOGGCA
Committee MemberVenarde, Bruce Lbvenarde@pitt.eduBVENARDE
Date: 30 September 2013
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 20 June 2013
Approval Date: 30 September 2013
Submission Date: 18 July 2013
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 398
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > French
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: nation, emotions, France, literature, massacres, wars, battles, Middle-ages, Renaissance
Date Deposited: 30 Sep 2013 14:48
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 14:14
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/19365

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item