Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

The effect of prenatal marijuana exposure on offspring marijuana use and cannabis use disorder in young adulthood

Sonon, Kristen (2014) The effect of prenatal marijuana exposure on offspring marijuana use and cannabis use disorder in young adulthood. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF
Primary Text

Download (914kB) | Preview

Abstract

Marijuana is the most commonly-used illicit substance among pregnant women. Few studies have been conducted on the long-term effects of prenatal marijuana exposure (PME) on offspring. This dissertation examines the association between PME and offspring marijuana use and cannabis use disorder (CUD) in young adulthood. First, the association between PME and offspring frequency of marijuana use at 22 years of age was evaluated. PME was defined as a continuous measure of the average daily joints and frequency of use by the offspring was defined as no use, using less than three times per week, and using three times per week or more. An ordinal logistic regression model was used. Results showed that PME was initially significant but this association was attenuated to non-significance after adjusting for covariates. Childhood maltreatment, but not race or gender, moderated the association between PME and offspring use. PME was associated with offspring frequency of use at low levels of childhood maltreatment, but not at high levels of childhood maltreatment. Second, a path analysis was used to evaluate pathways from PME to frequency of marijuana use in offspring. Results showed a significant indirect path through early initiation of marijuana. There was also a significant indirect path through depressive symptoms and early initiation of marijuana. In addition, PME predicted early marijuana initiation but maternal marijuana use during the offspring’s childhood did not. Third, a path analysis was used to evaluate pathways from PME to CUD. Results showed a significant indirect path of PME on CUD through early initiation of marijuana. There was also a significant indirect path of PME on CUD through depressive symptoms in childhood and early initiation of marijuana. In summary, PME may create a biologic vulnerability in offspring. In addition, aspects of the offspring’s environment also contribute to marijuana use and CUD in young adulthood. The findings of this dissertation are significant to public health. Healthcare professionals should encourage pregnant women to abstain from marijuana and public health programs should target youth to delay marijuana initiation.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Sonon, Kristenkrs114@pitt.eduKRS114
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairDay, Nancynday@pitt.eduNDAY
Committee MemberCornelius, Jackjcornel@pitt.eduJCORNEL
Committee MemberKim, Kevinkhkim@pitt.eduKHKIM
Committee MemberRichardson , Galegar@pitt.eduGAR
Date: 29 January 2014
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 11 November 2013
Approval Date: 29 January 2014
Submission Date: 17 November 2013
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 154
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: marijuana cannabis prenatal marijuana
Date Deposited: 29 Jan 2014 17:27
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 14:15
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/20012

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item