Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Body mass index and risk of pancreatic cancer in a Chinese population

Untawale, S and Odegaard, AO and Koh, WP and Jin, AZ and Yuan, JM and Anderson, KE (2014) Body mass index and risk of pancreatic cancer in a Chinese population. PLoS ONE, 9 (1).

[img]
Preview
PDF
Published Version
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (148kB) | Preview
[img] Plain Text (licence)
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (1kB)

Abstract

Few studies have examined the association between body mass index (BMI: kg/m2) and pancreatic cancer risk in Asian populations. We examined this relationship in 51,251 Chinese men and women aged 45-74 who enrolled between 1993 and 1998 in the population based, prospective Singapore Chinese Health Study. Data were collected through in-person interviews. By December 31, 2011, 194 cohort participants had developed pancreatic cancer. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We hypothesized the association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk may vary by smoking status (ever v. never) and there was evidence for this as the interaction between BMI and smoking status was significant (p= 0.018). Among ever smokers, being classified as underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m2), was associated with a significantly elevated risk of pancreatic cancer relative to smokers with a BMI of 21.5-24.4 kg/m 2 (HR=1.99, 95% CI = 1.03-3.84). This association was strengthened after exclusion of the first three years of follow-up time. Among never smokers, there was no association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. However, after excluding pancreatic cancer cases and person-years in the first three years of follow-up, never smokers with a BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m2 showed a suggestive increased risk of pancreatic cancer relative to never smokers with a BMI of 21.5-24.4 kg/m2 (HR = 1.75, 95% CI = 0.93-3.3). In conclusion, Singaporean Chinese who were underweight with a history of smoking had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer, whereas there was no significant association between BMI and pancreatic cancer in never smokers. © 2014 Untawale et al.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Untawale, S
Odegaard, AO
Koh, WP
Jin, AZ
Yuan, JMyuanj@pitt.eduYUANJ
Anderson, KE
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorAkiba, SuminoriUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 15 January 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 9
Number: 1
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085149
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2014 17:30
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2018 21:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/21871

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics

Altmetric.com


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item