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HIV infection and sexual risk among men who have sex with men and women (MSMW): A systematic review and meta-analysis

Friedman, MR and Wei, C and Klem, ML and Silvestre, AJ and Markovic, N and Stall, R (2014) HIV infection and sexual risk among men who have sex with men and women (MSMW): A systematic review and meta-analysis. PLoS ONE, 9 (1).

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Abstract

Objectives: To estimate the number of men who have sex with men and women who are HIV-positive in the United States, and to compare HIV prevalence rates between men who have sex with men and women, men who have sex with men only, and men who have sex with women exclusively. Methods: Following PRISMA guidelines, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of reports referencing HIV prevalence and men who have sex with men and women. We searched PubMed and Ovid PsycINFO for peer-reviewed, U.S.-based articles reporting on HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men and women. We conducted event rate, effect size, moderation and sensitivity analyses. Results: We estimate that 1.0% of U.S. males are bisexually-behaving, and that 121,800 bisexually-behaving men are HIV-positive. Men who have sex with men and women are less than half as likely to be HIV-positive as men who have sex with men only (16.9% vs. 33.3%; OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.31, 0.54), but more than five times as likely to be HIV-positive as men who have sex with women exclusively (18.3% vs. 3.5%; OR = 5.71, 95% CI: 3.47, 9.39). They are less likely to engage in unprotected receptive anal intercourse than men who have sex with men only (15.9% vs. 35.0%; OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.28, 0.46). Men who have sex with men and women in samples with high racial/ethnic minority proportions had significantly higher HIV prevalence than their counterparts in low racial/ethnic minority samples. Conclusions: This represents the first meta-analysis of HIV prevalence in the U.S. between men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only. Data collection, research, and HIV prevention and care delivery specifically tailored to men who have sex with men and women are necessary to better quantify and ameliorate this population's HIV burden. © 2014 Friedman et al.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Friedman, MRmrf9@pitt.eduMRF9orcid.org/0000-0001-6191-9799
Wei, C
Klem, MLklem@pitt.eduKLEM0000-0003-3481-5737
Silvestre, AJtonys@pitt.eduTONYS
Markovic, Nninam@pitt.eduNINAM
Stall, Rrstall@pitt.eduRSTALL
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorRemis, Robert S.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 30 January 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 9
Number: 1
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0087139
Schools and Programs: University libraries > Health Sciences Library System
Graduate School of Public Health > Behavioral and Community Health Sciences
Graduate School of Public Health > Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
School of Dental Medicine > Dental Science
Refereed: Yes
Article Type: Review
Date Deposited: 18 Jun 2014 19:48
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2020 00:57
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/21892

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