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The More the Merrier? Examining Three Interaction Hypotheses

Chi, Min and VanLehn, Kurt and Litman, Diane J. (2010) The More the Merrier? Examining Three Interaction Hypotheses. In: Proceedings Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci). UNSPECIFIED. ISBN UNSPECIFIED

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Abstract

While high interactivity is one of the key characteristics of oneon-one human tutoring, a great deal of controversy surrounds the issue of whether interactivity is indeed the key feature of tutorial dialogue that impacts students ’ learning. In this paper we investigate three interaction hypotheses: a widely-believed monotonic interactivity hypothesis, a better supported interaction plateau hypothesis, and our tactical interaction hypothesis. The monotonic interaction hypothesis predicts that increasing interactivity causes an increase in learning; the plateau hypothesis states that increasing interactivity yields increasing learning until it hits a plateau, and further increases in interactivity do not cause noticeable increases in learning. Finally, the tactical interaction hypothesis predicts that interactivity only increases learning when interactions are guided by effective tutorial tactics. In this paper, we examine each hypothesis in the context of an empirical study, the results of which support the tactical interaction hypothesis.


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Details

Item Type: Book Section
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Chi, Min
VanLehn, Kurt
Litman, Diane J.dlitman@pitt.eduDLITMAN
Centers: University Centers > Learning Research and Development Center (LRDC)
Date: 2010
Date Type: Publication
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Computer Science
Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Intelligent Systems
Refereed: Yes
Title of Book: Proceedings Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci)
Date Deposited: 05 May 2015 16:26
Last Modified: 01 Nov 2017 13:57
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/22933

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