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Shift in the microbial ecology of a hospital hot water system following the introduction of an on-site monochloramine disinfection system

Baron, JL and Vikram, A and Duda, S and Stout, JE and Bibby, K (2014) Shift in the microbial ecology of a hospital hot water system following the introduction of an on-site monochloramine disinfection system. PLoS ONE, 9 (7).

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Abstract

Drinking water distribution systems, including premise plumbing, contain a diverse microbiological community that may include opportunistic pathogens. On-site supplemental disinfection systems have been proposed as a control method for opportunistic pathogens in premise plumbing. The majority of on-site disinfection systems to date have been installed in hospitals due to the high concentration of opportunistic pathogen susceptible occupants. The installation of on-site supplemental disinfection systems in hospitals allows for evaluation of the impact of on-site disinfection systems on drinking water system microbial ecology prior to widespread application. This study evaluated the impact of supplemental monochloramine on the microbial ecology of a hospital's hot water system. Samples were taken three months and immediately prior to monochloramine treatment and monthly for the first six months of treatment, and all samples were subjected to high throughput Illumina 16S rRNA region sequencing. The microbial community composition of monochloramine treated samples was dramatically different than the baseline months. There was an immediate shift towards decreased relative abundance of Betaproteobacteria, and increased relative abundance of Firmicutes, Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Actinobacteria. Following treatment, microbial populations grouped by sampling location rather than sampling time. Over the course of treatment the relative abundance of certain genera containing opportunistic pathogens and genera containing denitrifying bacteria increased. The results demonstrate the driving influence of supplemental disinfection on premise plumbing microbial ecology and suggest the value of further investigation into the overall effects of premise plumbing disinfection strategies on microbial ecology and not solely specific target microorganisms. © 2014 Baron et al.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Baron, JL
Vikram, A
Duda, S
Stout, JEjes20@pitt.eduJES20
Bibby, Kbibbykj@pitt.eduBIBBYKJ
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorBereswill, StefanUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 17 July 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 9
Number: 7
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0102679
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
School of Medicine > Computational and Systems Biology
Swanson School of Engineering > Civil and Environmental Engineering
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 26 Sep 2014 17:40
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2019 16:58
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/23000

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