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Mucosa-associated bacterial diversity in necrotizing enterocolitis

Brower-Sinning, R and Zhong, D and Good, M and Firek, B and Baker, R and Sodhi, CP and Hackam, DJ and Morowitz, MJ (2014) Mucosa-associated bacterial diversity in necrotizing enterocolitis. PLoS ONE, 9 (9).

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Abstract

© 2014 Brower-Sinning et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background: Previous studies of infant fecal samples have failed to clarify the role of gut bacteria in the pathogenesis of NEC. We sought to characterize bacterial communities within intestinal tissue resected from infants with and without NEC. Methods: 26 intestinal samples were resected from 19 infants, including 16 NEC samples and 10 non-NEC samples. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences were amplified and sequenced. Analysis allowed for taxonomic identification, and quantitative PCR was used to quantify the bacterial load within samples. Results: NEC samples generally contained an increased total burden of bacteria. NEC and non-NEC sample sets were both marked by high inter-individual variability and an abundance of opportunistic pathogens. There was no statistically significant distinction between the composition of NEC and non-NEC microbial communities. K-means clustering enabled us to identify several stable clusters, including clusters of NEC and midgut volvulus samples enriched with Clostridium and Bacteroides. Another cluster containing both NEC and non-NEC samples was marked by an abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and decreased diversity among NEC samples. Conclusions: The results indicate that NEC is a disease without a uniform pattern of microbial colonization, but that NEC is associated with an abundance of strict anaerobes and a decrease in community diversity.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Brower-Sinning, R
Zhong, Ddiz6@pitt.eduDIZ6
Good, Mmlg101@pitt.eduMLG101
Firek, Bbaf4@pitt.eduBAF4
Baker, R
Sodhi, CP
Hackam, DJ
Morowitz, MJmjm226@pitt.eduMJM226
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorDutilh, Bas E.UNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 1 September 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 9
Number: 9
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105046
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Pediatrics
School of Medicine > Surgery
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 26 Sep 2014 14:29
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2017 00:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/23007

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