Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

The implementation of a dual diagnostic treatment team for adults with co-occurring intellectual/development disabilities and a mental health diagnosis

Trostel, Annie (2014) The implementation of a dual diagnostic treatment team for adults with co-occurring intellectual/development disabilities and a mental health diagnosis. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

This is the latest version of this item.

[img] Microsoft Word
Submitted Version
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (69kB)
[img] Plain Text (licence)
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (1kB)

Abstract

Approximately one in five adults living in the United States currently suffer from mental illness. Within the Intellectually/Developmentally Disabled population, however, the rate of mental illness is much higher at approximately three to four times the rate. This combination of diagnoses is sometimes referred to as ‘dual diagnosis’. The term ‘dual diagnosis’ has traditionally been used to describe people with a co-occurring mental health diagnosis and a substance abuse problem. In this paper, however, it will be used to discuss those people with an intellectual or developmental disability (I/DD) and a mental health (MH) diagnosis. This population has many needs that are often not fully met. The Allegheny County Department of Human Services (ACDHS) has partnered with Community Care Behavioral Health (CCBH) and Northwest Human Services (NHS) to implement a new service delivery model called the Dual Diagnostic Treatment Team (DDTT) to better serve this unique population. Conventionally, this population has been treated for its mental health separately from its intellectual and/or developmental disabilities. The DDTT is a service delivery model that integrates services tailored to individuals with I/DD and an MH diagnoses. DDTT hopes to ensure effective utilization management, improve service outcomes by providing coordinated person-centered care, and attain best practices for treating dual diagnosis. This paper provides a description of the purpose, rationale, design, and public health significance of the program, an evaluation of the implementation process thus far, proposes methods to evaluate outcomes, and recommends future tasks to ensure feasibility.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Trostel, Annie
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairDonohue, Julie Mjdonohue@pitt.eduJDONOHUEUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberVoorhees, Ronald E.rev12@pitt.eduREV12UNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberBell, Sheilasheila.bell@alleghenycounty.usUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 2014
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Health Policy & Management
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2015 21:25
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2021 09:00
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/23785

Available Versions of this Item

  • The implementation of a dual diagnostic treatment team for adults with co-occurring intellectual/development disabilities and a mental health diagnosis. (deposited 17 Aug 2015 21:25) [Currently Displayed]

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item