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Impact of emphysema heterogeneity on pulmonary function

Ju, J and Li, R and Gu, S and Leader, JK and Wang, X and Chen, Y and Zheng, B and Wu, S and Gur, D and Sciurba, F and Pu, J (2014) Impact of emphysema heterogeneity on pulmonary function. PLoS ONE, 9 (11).

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Abstract

© 2014 Ju et al. Results: The majority (128/160) of the subjects with COPD had a heterogeneity greater than zero. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking history, and extent of emphysema, heterogeneity in depicted disease in upper lobe dominant cases was positively associated with pulmonary function measures, such as FEV1 Predicted (p<.001) and FEV1/FVC (p<.001), as well as disease severity (p<0.05). We found a negative association between HI% , RV/TLC (p<0.001), and DLco% (albeit not a statistically significant one, p = 0.06) in this group of patients.Conclusion: Subjects with more homogeneous distribution of emphysema and/or lower lung dominant emphysema tend to have worse pulmonary function.Objectives: To investigate the association between emphysema heterogeneity in spatial distribution, pulmonary function and disease severity. Copyright:Methods and Materials: We ascertained a dataset of anonymized Computed Tomography (CT) examinations acquired on 565 participants in a COPD study. Subjects with chronic bronchitis (CB) and/or bronchodilator response were excluded resulting in 190 cases without COPD and 160 cases with COPD. Low attenuations areas (LAAs) (≤950 Hounsfield Unit (HU)) were identified and quantified at the level of individual lobes. Emphysema heterogeneity was defined in a manner that ranged in value from 2100% to 100%. The association between emphysema heterogeneity and pulmonary function measures (e.g., FEV1% predicted, RV/TLC, and DLco% predicted) adjusted for age, sex, and smoking history (pack-years) was assessed using multiple linear regression analysis.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Ju, J
Li, Rrul12@pitt.eduRUL12
Gu, S
Leader, JKjklst3@pitt.eduJKLST3
Wang, X
Chen, Y
Zheng, B
Wu, S
Gur, Dgur@pitt.eduGUR
Sciurba, Ffcs@pitt.eduFCS
Pu, Jjip13@pitt.eduJIP13
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorBogaard, HarmUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 19 November 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 9
Number: 11
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0113320
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Biostatistics
School of Medicine > Medicine
School of Medicine > Radiology
Swanson School of Engineering > Bioengineering
Refereed: Yes
Other ID: NLM PMC4237430
PubMed Central ID: PMC4237430
PubMed ID: 25409328
Date Deposited: 12 May 2015 18:31
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2019 19:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/24064

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