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Self-reported body fat change in HIV-infected men is a marker of decline in physical health-related quality of life with aging, independent of co-morbidity

Erlandson, KM and Reynolds, SM and Cox, C and Palella, FJ and Witt, MD and Kingsley, LA and Brown, TT and Plankey, M (2014) Self-reported body fat change in HIV-infected men is a marker of decline in physical health-related quality of life with aging, independent of co-morbidity. PLoS ONE, 9 (12).

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Abstract

© 2014 Erlandson et al. Objective: Self-perception of changes in body fat among HIV+ persons is associated with decreased health related quality of life in cross-sectional studies. The longitudinal impact of body fat changes on health related quality of life, while accounting for comorbidity and anatomic location or severity of body fat changes, is unknown. Design: This was a longitudinal analysis of HIV+ and HIV- Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants who completed questionnaires assessing self-perceived body fat changes (baseline visit) and a health related quality of life (Short Form-36) at baseline and then ≥5 years later. Methods: Relationships between body fat changes and change in Short Form-36 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores were investigated using mixedmodel regression. Results: We studied 270 HIV+ and 247 HIV- men. At baseline, ≥50% of HIV+ men reported body fat changes; physical component but not mental component summary scores were lower among HIV+ men who reported moderate/severe leg or abdominal fat changes (p<0.05). At follow-up, physical component summary scores were significantly lower among men with face, leg, or abdominal fat changes compared to men without perceived fat changes (p<0.05). No significant changes were seen in mental component scores by fat change location or severity. In the final model, body fat changes at any site or severity were significant predictors of a decline in physical component summary score (p<0.05), independent of demographics or comorbidities. Mental component summary score was not associated with body fat changes, but higher mental component summary score was associated with increasing age and time. Conclusions: Negative self-perceived body fat changes were associated with decline in physical health related quality of life, independent of comorbidities, and may be a marker of an increased risk for physical function decline with aging.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Erlandson, KM
Reynolds, SM
Cox, C
Palella, FJ
Witt, MD
Kingsley, LAkingsley@pitt.eduKINGSLEY
Brown, TT
Plankey, M
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorPhilip, AnglewiczUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 1 December 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 9
Number: 12
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114166
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Infectious Diseases and Microbiology
Refereed: Yes
Other ID: NLM PMC4250188
PubMed Central ID: PMC4250188
PubMed ID: 25436612
Date Deposited: 12 May 2015 18:35
Last Modified: 05 Feb 2019 07:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/24068

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