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Trajectories of gait speed predict mortality in well-functioning older adults: The health, aging and body composition study

White, DK and Neogi, T and Nevitt, MC and Peloquin, CE and Zhu, Y and Boudreau, RM and Cauley, JA and Ferrucci, L and Harris, TB and Satterfield, SM and Simonsick, EM and Strotmeyer, ES and Zhang, Y (2013) Trajectories of gait speed predict mortality in well-functioning older adults: The health, aging and body composition study. Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 68 (4). 456 - 464. ISSN 1079-5006

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Abstract

Background.Although gait speed slows with age, the rate of slowing varies greatly. To date, little is known about the trajectories of gait speed, their correlates, and their risk for mortality in older adults.Methods.Gait speed during a 20-m walk was measured for a period of 8 years in initially well-functioning men and women aged 70-79 years participating in the Health, Aging and Body Composition study. We described the trajectories of gait speed and examined their correlates using a group-based mixture model. Also risk associated with different gait speed trajectories on all-cause mortality was estimated using a Cox-proportional hazard model.Results.Of 2,364 participants (mean age, 73.5±2.9 years; 52% women), we identified three gait speed trajectories: slow (n 637), moderate (n 1,209), and fast decline (n 518). Those with fast decline slowed 0.030 m/s per year or 2.4% per year from baseline to the last follow-up visit. Women, blacks, and participants who were obese, had limited knee extensor strength, and had low physical activity were more likely to have fast decline than their counterparts. Participants with fast decline in gait speed had a 90% greater risk of mortality than those with slow decline.Conclusion.Despite being well-functioning at baseline, a quarter of older adults experienced fast decline in gait speed, which was associated with an increased risk of mortality. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved.


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Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
White, DK
Neogi, T
Nevitt, MC
Peloquin, CE
Zhu, Y
Boudreau, RMBoudreauR@edc.pitt.eduROB21
Cauley, JAJCauley@edc.pitt.eduJCAULEY
Ferrucci, L
Harris, TB
Satterfield, SM
Simonsick, EM
Strotmeyer, ESstrotmeyere@edc.pitt.eduELSST21
Zhang, Y
Date: 1 April 2013
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume: 68
Number: 4
Page Range: 456 - 464
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1093/gerona/gls197
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1079-5006
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2015 01:37
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2019 15:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/24259

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