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Collaborative practice agreements (CPAs) in chain community pharmicies: strategies for implementation and scalability

Bacci, Jennifer (2015) Collaborative practice agreements (CPAs) in chain community pharmicies: strategies for implementation and scalability. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Collaborative practice agreements (CPAs) facilitate collaborative, interdisciplinary patient care by serving as a mutually agreed upon written plan between physicians and pharmacists delineating the primary care and medication management functions of pharmacists. CPAs have not been widely implemented. This study aims to (1) identify solutions for external barriers affecting the implementation and scalability of CPAs, and (2) develop a model for operationalizing CPAs within chain community pharmacy organizations. Of major public health significance, determining how to implement and scale CPAs is critical to ensuring all people access to primary care services in their own communities. This study employed the National Implementation Research Network’s conceptual model of implementation to determine the multilevel influences affecting the uptake and dissemination of CPAs. Key informant interviews were conducted with licensed pharmacists who hold either a pharmacy staffing or clinical management position within a traditional, supermarket, or mass merchant chain with pharmacies located in New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and/or West Virginia. The semi- structured interview script was developed based on the Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety (SEIPS) model of work system and patient safety. Interviews were conducted until data saturation was achieved. The data underwent thematic analysis guided by the conceptual model and the SEIPS work system framework. This study revealed that there are multiple strategies to facilitate the implementation and scalability of CPAs. These strategies include establishing physician relationships, enhancing pharmacists’ education and training, addressing patients’ perception, structuring time and workload, and advocating for CPA laws at the state level and provider status at the national level. Strategies for addressing these needs can be incorporated into a model for operationalizing CPAs within chain community pharmacy organizations. There must be coordination between the patient, the community pharmacies, and the physician in order for CPAs to be implemented successfully. District and corporate management can create opportunities to support patient, pharmacist, and physician coordination and is critical to replicating CPAs. Collaboration with professional organizations and schools of pharmacy can be essential to scaling CPAs within an organization.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Bacci, Jenniferjbacci@pitt.eduJBACCI
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairFinegold, David N.david.finegold@pitt.eduDNFUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberMcGivney, Melissa S.somma@pitt.eduSOMMAUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberColey, Kimcoley@pitt.eduCOLEYUNSPECIFIED
Date: April 2015
Date Type: Submission
Submission Date: 6 April 2015
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Multidisciplinary MPH
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: collaborative, drug, therapy, management, collaborative, practice, agreements, community, pharmacy, implementation
Date Deposited: 19 Oct 2015 16:44
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2019 15:02
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/24513

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