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Motor-related brain activity during action observation: A neural substrate for electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces after spinal cord injury

Collinger, JL and Vinjamuri, R and Degenhart, AD and Weber, DJ and Sudre, GP and Boninger, ML and Tyler-Kabara, EC and Wang, W (2014) Motor-related brain activity during action observation: A neural substrate for electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces after spinal cord injury. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, 8 (FEB). ISSN 1662-5145

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Abstract

After spinal cord injury (SCI), motor commands from the brain are unable to reach peripheral nerves and muscles below the level of the lesion. Action observation (AO), in which a person observes someone else performing an action, has been used to augment traditional rehabilitation paradigms. Similarly, AO can be used to derive the relationship between brain activity and movement kinematics for a motor-based brain-computer interface (BCI) even when the user cannot generate overt movements. BCIs use brain signals to control external devices to replace functions that have been lost due to SCI or other motor impairment. Previous studies have reported congruent motor cortical activity during observed and overt movements using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Recent single-unit studies using intracortical microelectrodes also demonstrated that a large number of motor cortical neurons had similar firing rate patterns between overt and observed movements. Given the increasing interest in electrocorticography (ECoG)-based BCIs, our goal was to identify whether action observation-related cortical activity could be recorded using ECoG during grasping tasks. Specifically, we aimed to identify congruent neural activity during observed and executed movements in both the sensorimotor rhythm (10-40 Hz) and the high-gamma band (65-115 Hz) which contains significant movement-related information. We observed significant motor-related high-gamma band activity during AO in both able-bodied individuals and one participant with a complete C4 SCI. Furthermore, in able-bodied participants, both the low and high frequency bands demonstrated congruent activity between action execution and observation. Our results suggest that AO could be an effective and critical procedure for deriving the mapping from ECoG signals to intended movement for an ECoG-based BCI system for individuals with paralysis. © 2014 Collinger, Vinjamuri, Degenhart, Weber, Sudre, Boninger, Tyler-Kabara and Wang.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Collinger, JLcollinger@pitt.eduCOLLINGR
Vinjamuri, R
Degenhart, ADalan.degenhart@pitt.eduADD19
Weber, DJdougweber@pitt.eduDJW500000-0002-9782-3497
Sudre, GP
Boninger, MLboninger@pitt.eduBONINGER
Tyler-Kabara, ECtylerk@pitt.eduTYLERK
Wang, Wwangwei3@pitt.eduWANGWEI3
Date: 19 February 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience
Volume: 8
Number: FEB
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.3389/fnint.2014.00017
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Neurological Surgery
School of Medicine > Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Swanson School of Engineering > Bioengineering
Refereed: Yes
ISSN: 1662-5145
Date Deposited: 05 May 2015 15:23
Last Modified: 12 Sep 2019 12:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/24874

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