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COLLECTIVE ACTION SYSTEMS IN IMMIGRATION AND MULTICULTURALISM POLICY AND PRACTICE: COMPLEXITY AND DYNAMICS OF INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL NETWORKS

YEO, JUNGWON (2015) COLLECTIVE ACTION SYSTEMS IN IMMIGRATION AND MULTICULTURALISM POLICY AND PRACTICE: COMPLEXITY AND DYNAMICS OF INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL NETWORKS. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Collective action has been explored as an alternative to traditional or single-minded actions in solving complex or ‘wicked’ problems prevalent in contemporary society. Yet, in order to improve its applicability and potential, existing gaps in field research need to be identified and filled.
Pointing out the lack of research in complexity and dynamics of collective action systems in every day social policy and practice, this dissertation focuses on uncovering those aspects by asking: How and why did collective action systems emerge in the first place, and continually change over time? What were the roles of public policy in the processes? How could the value of collective action systems be enhanced?
To answer these questions, this dissertation investigates collective action systems in immigration and multiculturalism policy and practice of two cities in South Korea, based on a theoretical framework drawn from the ‘institutional analysis and development framework’, theories of structures—complex adaptive systems and social networks, and theory of fields. A set of data was collected by mixed methods, i.e., network coding, semi-structured interviews, and perception surveys, and documentation reviews. Then, descriptive/statistical social network analyses, process tracing, decision analysis, documentary analysis, and descriptive statistics were utilized to explore the emergence and change in local collective action systems in the policy arena from 2002 to 2013.
Findings suggest that regardless of inherent contextual differences between the cases, local collective action systems emerged when local participants established a shared definition of local immigrants, and collective goals to serve those local immigrants. However, the immigration and multiculturalism Acts and policies, accompanied with standardized policy implementation procedures, resulted in change in the existing systems in both cities. Despite the frustration due to recent system changes and some contextual roadblocks, local participants still perceived benefits of local collective action systems in the policy arena. Thus, this dissertation suggests policy recommendations that can control the contextual, structural, procedural, and perceptual impediments, and enhance the value of the collective action systems in policy and practice.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
YEO, JUNGWONeimy1357@gmail.com0000-0002-4991-7026
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairComfort, Louise K. lkc@pitt.edu LKC
Committee MemberDunn, William N.dunn@pitt.edu DUNN
Committee MemberMiller, David Y.dymiller@pitt.edu DYMILLER
Committee MemberDruzdzel, Marek J.marek@sis.pitt.eduDRUZDZEL
Committee MemberKo, Kilkonkilkon@snu.ac.kr
Date: 1 July 2015
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 20 April 2015
Approval Date: 1 July 2015
Submission Date: 11 May 2015
Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
Number of Pages: 315
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public and International Affairs > Public and International Affairs
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Collective Action, Policy Analysis, Complex Adaptive Systems, Social Network, Immigration Policy, Decision Making
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2015 14:41
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 14:28
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/25200

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