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Graduate Archival Education in the United States; A Personal Reflection About Its Past and Future

Cox, Richard J. (2015) Graduate Archival Education in the United States; A Personal Reflection About Its Past and Future. Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies, 2 (Articl). 1 - 9.

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Abstract

From one vantage, those who started their careers decades ago, graduate archival education has made tremendous leaps forward; from another perspective, those in the early years of their careers, education in this field may look spotty, disjointed, and confusing. As I near the end of my career (although old archivists don’t fade away, they get preserved), I have increasingly felt like an archival source in ongoing professional dialogue. In this essay, I briefly consider the evolution of graduate education since the 1970s, the emergence of a new archival professorial corps, the maturing of our field’s professional and scholarly research, and the present characteristics of the archival academy. In this, I reflect as a transitional member of the academy, one who moved from practice to professing, and speculate about what the new generation of archival faculty – younger, less experienced, better educated, and research-driven, face in the next four decades. Examining current trends leads me to speculate about what graduate archival education will look like in 2050, and what I have to say is not what I am wishing for but what will likely occur. By 2050 I will be part of archival memory. What passes for archival education will be digital stewardship, delivered mostly via distance education with on-campus programs fewer in number and those that exist focused on doctoral studies and research, and masters programs mostly technical in nature and spread more broadly across the academy with a much more diverse group of students in terms of academic backgrounds and demographic characteristics.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Cox, Richard J.rjcox@pitt.eduRJCOX
Date: 2015
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies
Volume: 2
Number: Articl
Publisher: Yale University Library and New England Archivists
Page Range: 1 - 9
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Information Sciences > Library and Information Science
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Archival, Education, Digital, Stewardship, Archival, Profession, --, United, States
Article Type: Research Article
Date Deposited: 27 May 2015 19:04
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2017 04:59
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/25267

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