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EFFECTS OF THE FAMILY CHECK-UP INTERVENTION ON REDUCING GROWTH IN CONDUCT PROBLEMS IN TODDLERHOOD THORUGH SCHOOL AGE: MODERATORS AND MODERATED MEDIATION

Shelleby, Elizabeth Coleman (2015) EFFECTS OF THE FAMILY CHECK-UP INTERVENTION ON REDUCING GROWTH IN CONDUCT PROBLEMS IN TODDLERHOOD THORUGH SCHOOL AGE: MODERATORS AND MODERATED MEDIATION. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Child conduct problems (CP), characterized by oppositionality, disruptiveness, aggression, and rule-breaking behavior, present a significant public health issue, as they are the most common reason children are referred for mental health services (Lavigne et al., 1996). Parenting interventions for child CP have been found to be efficacious, with meta-analyses demonstrating small to moderate effects (e.g., Lundahl et al., 2006; Reyno & McGrath 2006). The Family Check-Up (FCU), a preventive intervention combining aspects of motivational interviewing with parent training, is one intervention found to significantly reduce child CP. As not all children improve following parenting interventions (Webster-Stratton, 1990; Webster-Stratton & Hammond, 1997), exploring moderators is an important way to identify subgroups who may respond differentially (Gardner et al., 2009). Baseline level of child CP is one important potential moderator, as young children with elevated CP are at risk for long-term persistence (Campbell, Shaw, & Gilliom, 2000). The current study examined baseline CP as a moderator of effectiveness of the FCU utilizing latent growth curves of parenting and child behavior, group-based trajectory models, and parallel-process moderated mediation models to explore parenting and maternal depression as mediators. Participants included 731 mother-child dyads recruited at child age 2 and followed to child age 9.5, half assigned to the FCU. The study involved structured annual in-home assessments and measures of maternal depression, observed parenting, and child CP from different informants. Intervention families were given the opportunity for annual check-ups and additional sessions as desired. The FCU was effective in reducing growth in CP across child ages 2 to 9.5. Engagement in feedback sessions led to greater benefits in a few outcomes. Findings on baseline CP as a moderator varied, with some models demonstrating greater benefit for those with higher baseline problems and others demonstrating non-significant differences. Assignment to the FCU was not associated with group-based trajectory membership, although baseline CP distinguished trajectory group membership. Finally, moderated mediation models were partially supported, with differential effects for those with high baseline CP only found for some of the hypothesized pathways. Results highlight the importance of examining subgroups to elucidate the potential for differential responsiveness to intervention.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Shelleby, Elizabeth Colemanecs38@pitt.eduECS38
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairShaw, Danielcasey@pitt.eduCASEY
Committee MemberCampbell, Susansbcamp@pitt.eduSBCAMP
Committee MemberVotruba-Drzal, Elizabethevotruba@pitt.eduEVOTRUBA
Committee MemberKolko, DavidKolkoDJ@upmc.eduKOLKO
Committee MemberNagin, Danieldn03@andrew.cmu.edu
Date: 27 September 2015
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 25 August 2014
Approval Date: 27 September 2015
Submission Date: 15 June 2015
Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
Number of Pages: 135
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Psychology
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: keywords
Date Deposited: 28 Sep 2015 02:00
Last Modified: 19 Dec 2016 14:42
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/25401

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