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A systematic review of mobile market interventions to address urban food deserts in the United States

Bornemann, Kellee (2015) A systematic review of mobile market interventions to address urban food deserts in the United States. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Food deserts are geographic areas that have poor access to nutritious foods. Previous research has shown that people living in food deserts are at greater risk for poor nutrition and diet-related diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. A new type of intervention to address food deserts is the mobile market intervention, a type of intervention involving travelling food dispensaries that sell fresh, healthy groceries in food-insecure communities. Although mobile market interventions are becoming increasingly popular as a means of alleviating food deserts in urban areas, the literature associated with this type of intervention had yet to be systematically reviewed. A systematic review was conducted to identify all peer-reviewed, published literature associated with mobile-based food distribution interventions conducted in US urban areas. A total of 10 articles met the inclusion criteria and were retrieved and reviewed. The interventions reviewed included both for-profit interventions that were free-market mobile produce businesses operated by private vendors, and not-for-profit interventions that were either community, grant, or research funded. The review suggests that the most successful mobile market interventions are those that provide affordable quality produce, focus on convenience and location, and cultivate community trust and community involvement. Overall, the mobile market interventions reviewed tended to positively affect fruit and vegetable access and consumption among low-income, low access communities. Mobile markets represent a low cost, self-sustaining, effective method of bringing healthy food to those that need it most. These results have public health significance because they can help guide future researchers, policy makers and public health officials in creating effective interventions to address food deserts.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master's Thesis)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Bornemann, Kellee
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairTerry, Martha Annmaterry@pitt.eduMATERRYUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberMyaskovsky, LarissaLarissa.Myaskovsky@va.govUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 23 November 2015
Date Type: Submission
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Behavioral and Community Health Sciences
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 20 May 2016 15:32
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2019 13:58
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/26460

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