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An overlook between the relationship of global climate change and vector-borne infectious agents focusing on malaria

Burrell, Allison (2016) An overlook between the relationship of global climate change and vector-borne infectious agents focusing on malaria. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Global temperatures fluctuate as part a natural climate cycle but over the past 100 years human influences have caused a shift in the patterns. Our temperatures have been warming at a more frequent rate and are having effects on other natural processes, like the natural habitats of mosquitoes. The shift in climates has allowed areas once inhabitable for mosquitoes to become breeding grounds. This influences the rates of vector-borne diseases, like malaria, and increases the number of people at risk for contracting these diseases. In lesser-developed nations, this puts a larger proportion of the population at risk due to lack or resources and treatments. The relationship between climate change and vector borne diseases is of public health significance because the potential loss of life due to vector borne disease will continue to increase as the climate continues to change.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Burrell, Allisonasb128@pitt.eduASB128
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairPearce, Lindalip10@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberFelter, ElizabethemfelterUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 22 April 2016
Date Type: Submission
Defense Date: 1 April 2016
Submission Date: 26 March 2016
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Environmental and Occupational Health
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Global, Climate, Change, and, Malaria
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2016 17:45
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2017 04:58
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/27351

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