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Controlling Light in Nanoscale Dimensions

Mendis, Agampodi Madu (2016) Controlling Light in Nanoscale Dimensions. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The study of materials with nanoscale dimensions has gained wide spread research interest as these exhibit novel properties that can be used to manipulation of light for applications ranging from biosensing to optoelectronics. Metallic nanostructures coupled with light exhibit a collective oscillation of conduction band electrons leading an optical feature known as surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Quantum confinement effects in semiconductor nanoparticles allows the control over optical and electronic properties by changing size and shape of the nanoparticle. In order to fully realize the full potential of these interesting properties in nanoscale materials, this dissertation explores on fundamentals of these light matter interactions in nanoscale. The first work in this dissertation investigates on a novel plasmonic array that can be integrated into microfluidic channels to monitor real time biological interactions. The second work explores on coupling between one dimensional chains of plasmonic nanoparticles which leads delocalized surface plasmon feature which is highly sensitive local dielectric changes. The third study uses SPR to detect and quantify the interaction between the HIV capsid proteins and lipid bilayer films with the goal of establishing a potential drug target for HIV infection. The last study investigates on a general strategy to eliminate Fermi level pinning in semiconductor quantum dots using a thin film of alumina which may enhance the photoconversion efficiency in Schottky junction solar cells. The topics covered here should enable an insight into the fundamentals of light matter interactions in nanostructures which may facilitate their applications in sensing and photovoltaics.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Mendis, Agampodi Madumnm29@pitt.eduMNM29
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairWaldeck, David H.dave@pitt.eduDAVE
Committee MemberWeber, Stephen G.sweber@pitt.eduSWEBER
Committee MemberMillstone, Jill E.jem210@pitt.eduJEM210
Committee MemberPeteanu, Linda A.peteanu@andrew.cmu.edu
Date: 8 June 2016
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 29 March 2016
Approval Date: 8 June 2016
Submission Date: 6 April 2016
Access Restriction: 5 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 5 years.
Number of Pages: 199
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Chemistry
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Plasmonics, Photonics, Nanoslit Arrays, Nanoparticle Chains, Quantum Dots, Fermi Level Pinning
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 08 Jun 2016 13:43
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2016 14:32
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/27592

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