Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Antibiotic development and the pharmaceutical industry: an examination of the 2012 Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now Act, the counterintuitive market for antibiotics research and development and the need for profit maximizing policy solutions

Crilly, Megan (2016) Antibiotic development and the pharmaceutical industry: an examination of the 2012 Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now Act, the counterintuitive market for antibiotics research and development and the need for profit maximizing policy solutions. Master's Thesis, University of Pittsburgh. (Unpublished)

[img]
Preview
PDF
Submitted Version

Download (2MB)

Abstract

There is growing concern within the public health community that the rapid decline of new antibiotics over the last two decades, coupled with the adaptive nature of bacterial infections, could lead to widespread disease without effective treatments. It is difficult for pharmaceutical companies to recoup the billions of dollars invested in the research and development (R&D) of new antibiotics because bacterial infections are treated with older antibiotics first and for short dosage periods to stymie antibiotic resistance. Without a means to recoup their R&D costs and enduring shareholder demands for profit-maximizing endeavors, many companies shut down their antibiotics labs in favor of more profitable medications, like those for chronic illnesses that require continual administration for extended periods. In an effort to stimulate more antibiotic R&D, the United States passed the Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now (GAIN) Act in 2012 to motivate companies to bring more antibiotic treatments to market. This paper aims to explain the supply and demand problems of the current market for antibiotics and analyze GAIN’s impact on R&D investment. After examining the amount of antibiotics in clinical trials before and after the GAIN Act, there was insufficient statistical evidence to support the hypothesis that GAIN altered the behavior of companies. This Act does not offer enough incentives to counteract the unique market anomaly antibiotics present. Without a continual robust antibiotic pipeline, bacterial infections, including new strains of antibiotic-resistant infections, will be untreatable. This study has public health significance because highlights the urgent nature of providing additional incentives to companies that invest in antibiotics R&D, without which, there will be few options to treat bacterial infections in the future.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Crilly, Meganmac302@pitt.eduMAC302
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairCastle, Nicholascastlen@pitt.eduCASTLEN
Committee MemberMartinson, Jeremy Jjmartins@pitt.eduJMARTINS
Committee MemberLongest, Beaufortlongest@pitt.eduLONGEST
Date: 29 June 2016
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 19 April 2016
Approval Date: 29 June 2016
Submission Date: 29 April 2016
Access Restriction: 3 year -- Restrict access to University of Pittsburgh for a period of 3 years.
Number of Pages: 54
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Health Policy & Management
Degree: MS - Master of Science
Thesis Type: Master's Thesis
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistance, Pharmaceutical Industry, Antibiotics Industry, 2012 Generating Antibiotics Now Act
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2016 17:56
Last Modified: 01 May 2019 05:15
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/27786

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item