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A pilot study examining physical and social warmth: Higher (non-febrile) oral temperature is associated with greater feelings of social connection

Inagaki, TK and Irwin, MR and Moieni, M and Jevtic, I and Eisenberger, NI (2016) A pilot study examining physical and social warmth: Higher (non-febrile) oral temperature is associated with greater feelings of social connection. PLoS ONE, 11 (6).

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Abstract

© 2016 Inagaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. An emerging literature suggests that experiences of physical warmth contribute to social warmth - the experience of feeling connected to others. Thus, thermoregulatory systems, which help maintain our relatively warm internal body temperatures, may also support feelings of social connection. However, the association between internal body temperature and feelings of connection has not been examined. Furthermore, the origins of the link between physical and social warmth, via learning during early experiences with a caregiver or via innate, co-evolved mechanisms, remain unclear. The current study examined the relationship between oral temperature and feelings of social connection as well as whether early caregiver experiences moderated this relationship. Extending the existing literature, higher oral temperature readings were associated with greater feelings of social connection. Moreover, early caregiver experiences did not moderate this association, suggesting that the physical-social warmth overlap may not be altered by early social experience. Results provide additional support for the link between experiences of physical warmth and social warmth and add to existing theories that highlight social connection as a basic need on its own.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Inagaki, TKinagaki@pitt.eduINAGAKI
Irwin, MR
Moieni, M
Jevtic, I
Eisenberger, NI
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorCostantini, MarcelloUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 1 June 2016
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 11
Number: 6
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0156873
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Psychology
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 22 Dec 2016 16:03
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2018 13:57
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/28224

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