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Intranasal dexmedetomidine as a sedative premedication for patients undergoing suspension laryngoscopy: A randomized double-blind study

Lu, C and Zhang, LM and Zhang, Y and Ying, Y and Li, L and Xu, L and Ruan, X (2016) Intranasal dexmedetomidine as a sedative premedication for patients undergoing suspension laryngoscopy: A randomized double-blind study. PLoS ONE, 11 (5).

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Abstract

© 2016 Lu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Background: Intranasal dexmedetomidine, a well-tolerated and convenient treatment option, has been shown to induce a favorable perioperative anxiolysis in children. We investigate intranasal dexmedetomidine as a sedative premedication for anesthesia recovery in an adult population. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial; 81 adult patients scheduled for elective suspension laryngoscopy received intranasal dexmedetomidine (1 μg·kg-1) or a placebo 45-60 min before anesthetic induction. Extubation time was used as the primary outcome measure. Secondary variables included the levels of sedation (Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale, OAA/S) and anxiety (4-point anxiety score), anesthetic and analgesic requirements, hemodynamic fluctuations, and anesthesia recovery as well as side effects. Results: The levels of sedation and anxiety differed significantly between the two groups at anesthesia pre-induction (p < 0.001 and = 0.001, respectively). Repeated-measure general linear model determined no significant interaction effect between group and time on the targeted concentration of propofol (F = 1.635, p = 0.200), but a significant main effect of group existed (F = 6.880, p = 0.010). A moderate but significant decrease in the heart rate was recorded in the dexmedetomidine group at pre-induction. Episodes of tachycardia and hypertension after tracheal intubation and extubation were more frequent in the placebo group. Conclusions: Intranasal dexmedetomidine as a sedative premedication induced a favorable perioperative anxiolysis without prolongation in anesthesia recovery; the hemodynamic effect was modest. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 02108171.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Lu, C
Zhang, LMliz19@pitt.eduLIZ19
Zhang, Y
Ying, Y
Li, L
Xu, L
Ruan, X
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorChopra, ArvindUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 1 May 2016
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 11
Number: 5
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0154192
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Anesthesiology
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 22 Dec 2016 16:02
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2019 14:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/28231

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