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The role of aerobic fitness in cortical thickness and mathematics achievement in preadolescent children

Chaddock-Heyman, L and Erickson, KI and Kienzler, C and King, M and Pontifex, MB and Raine, LB and Hillman, CH and Kramer, AF (2015) The role of aerobic fitness in cortical thickness and mathematics achievement in preadolescent children. PLoS ONE, 10 (8).

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Abstract

© 2015 Chaddock-Heyman et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Growing evidence suggests that aerobic fitness benefits the brain and cognition during childhood. The present study is the first to explore cortical brain structure of higher fit and lower fit 9-and 10-year-old children, and how aerobic fitness and cortical thickness relate to academic achievement. We demonstrate that higher fit children (>70th percentile VO2max) showed decreased gray matter thickness in superior frontal cortex, superior temporal areas, and lateral occipital cortex, coupled with better mathematics achievement, compared to lower fit children (<30th percentile VO2max). Furthermore, cortical gray matter thinning in anterior and superior frontal areas was associated with superior arithmetic performance. Together, these data add to our knowledge of the biological markers of school achievement, particularly mathematics achievement, and raise the possibility that individual differences in aerobic fitness play an important role in cortical gray matter thinning during brain maturation. The establishment of predictors of academic performance is key to helping educators focus on interventions to maximize learning and success across the lifespan.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Chaddock-Heyman, L
Erickson, KIkiericks@pitt.eduKIERICKS
Kienzler, C
King, M
Pontifex, MB
Raine, LB
Hillman, CH
Kramer, AF
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorPtito, MauriceUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 12 August 2015
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 10
Number: 8
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0134115
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences > Psychology
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2016 14:28
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2019 15:57
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/28399

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