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Direct transfer of viral and cellular proteins from varicella-zoster virus-infected non-neuronal cells to human axons

Grigoryan, S and Yee, MB and Glick, Y and Gerber, D and Kepten, E and Garini, Y and Yang, IH and Kinchington, PR and Goldstein, RS (2015) Direct transfer of viral and cellular proteins from varicella-zoster virus-infected non-neuronal cells to human axons. PLoS ONE, 10 (5).

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Abstract

© 2015 Grigoryan et al. Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection and Herpes zoster (shingles) following reactivation in latently infected neurons, is known to be fusogenic. It forms polynuclear syncytia in culture, in varicella skin lesions and in infected fetal human ganglia xenografted to mice. After axonal infection using VZV expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in compartmentalized microfluidic cultures there is diffuse filling of axons with GFP as well as punctate fluorescence corresponding to capsids. Use of viruses with fluorescent fusions to VZV proteins reveals that both proteins encoded by VZV genes and those of the infecting cell are transferred in bulk from infecting non-neuronal cells to axons. Similar transfer of protein to axons was observed following cell associated HSV1 infection. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments provide evidence that this transfer is by diffusion of proteins from the infecting cells into axons. Time-lapse movies and immunocytochemical experiments in co-cultures demonstrate that non-neuronal cells fuse with neuronal somata and proteins from both cell types are present in the syncytia formed. The fusogenic nature of VZV therefore may enable not only conventional entry of virions and capsids into axonal endings in the skin by classical entry mechanisms, but also by cytoplasmic fusion that permits viral protein transfer to neurons in bulk.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Grigoryan, S
Yee, MBMBY1@pitt.eduMBY1
Glick, Y
Gerber, D
Kepten, E
Garini, Y
Yang, IH
Kinchington, PRkinch@pitt.eduKINCH
Goldstein, RS
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
EditorMessaoudi, IlhemUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 14 May 2015
Date Type: Publication
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
Volume: 10
Number: 5
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1371/journal.pone.0126081
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2016 14:09
Last Modified: 30 Oct 2018 14:01
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/28478

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