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Cognitive tasks and cerebral blood flow through anterior cerebral arteries: A study via functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound recordings

Bleton, H and Perera, S and Sejdić, E (2016) Cognitive tasks and cerebral blood flow through anterior cerebral arteries: A study via functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound recordings. BMC Medical Imaging, 16 (1).

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Abstract

© 2016 Bleton et al. Background: Functional transcanial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a convenient approach to examine cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) in major cerebral arteries. Methods: In this study, the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) was insonated on both sides, that is, right ACA (R-ACA) and left ACA (L-ACA). The envelope signals (the maximum velocity) and the raw signals were analyzed during cognitive processes, i.e. word-generation tasks, geometric tasks and resting state periods separating each task. Data which were collected from 20 healthy participants were used to investigate the changes and the hemispheric functioning while performing cognitive tasks. Signal characteristics were analyzed in time domain, frequency domain and time-frequency domain. Results: Significant results have been obtained through the use of both classic/modern methods (i.e. envelope/raw, time and frequency/information-theoretic and time-frequency domains). The frequency features extracted from the raw signals highlighted sex effects on cerebral blood flow which revealed distinct brain response during each process and during resting periods. In the time-frequency analysis, the distribution of wavelet energies on the envelope signals moved around the low frequencies during mental processes and did not experience any lateralization during cognitive tasks. Conclusions: Even if no lateralization effects were noticed during resting-state, verbal and geometric tasks, understanding CBFV in ACA during cognitive tasks could complement information extracted from cerebral blood flow in middle cerebral arteries during similar cognitive tasks (i.e. sex effects).


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Bleton, H
Perera, S
Sejdić, Eesejdic@pitt.eduESEJDIC0000-0003-4987-8298
Date: 12 March 2016
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Medical Imaging
Volume: 16
Number: 1
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1186/s12880-016-0125-0
Schools and Programs: Swanson School of Engineering > Electrical and Computer Engineering
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2016 19:10
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2019 15:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/28704

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