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Establishing a continuum of acute kidney injury - tracing AKI using data source linkage and long-term follow-up: Workgroup Statements from the 15th ADQI Consensus Conference

Mehta, R and Bihorac, A and Selby, NM and Quan, H and Goldstein, SL and Kellum, JA and Ronco, C and Bagshaw, SM (2016) Establishing a continuum of acute kidney injury - tracing AKI using data source linkage and long-term follow-up: Workgroup Statements from the 15th ADQI Consensus Conference. Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, 3 (1).

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Abstract

© 2016 Mehta et al. Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is independently associated with the development of chronic kidney disease, endstage kidney disease and increased all-cause and cardiovascular-specific mortality. The severity of the renal insult and the development of multiple AKI episodes increase the risk of occurrence of these outcomes. Despite these long-term effects, only a minority of patients receive nephrologist follow up after an episode of AKI; those that do may have improved outcomes. Furthermore, relatively simple quality improvement strategies have the potential to change this status quo. Methods: On this background, a working group of the 15 th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) conference applied the consensus-building process informed by review of English language articles identified through PubMed search to address questions related to the opportunities, methodological requirements and barriers for longitudinal follow-up of patients with AKI in the era of electronic health records and Big Data. Results: Four consensus statements answering the key questions identified by the working group are developed. Conclusions: We have identified minimal data elements and potential data sources necessary to trace the natural history of patients from onset of AKI to long-term outcome. Minimum infrastructure and key barriers to achieving these goals are outlined together with proposed solutions.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Mehta, R
Bihorac, A
Selby, NM
Quan, H
Goldstein, SL
Kellum, JAkellum@pitt.eduKELLUM0000-0003-1995-2653
Ronco, C
Bagshaw, SM
Date: 26 February 2016
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
Volume: 3
Number: 1
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1186/s40697-016-0102-0
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Critical Care Medicine
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2016 19:01
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2019 13:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/28726

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