Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Issues of methods and interpretation in the National Cancer Institute formaldehyde cohort study

Marsh, GM and Morfeld, P and Collins, JJ and Symons, JM (2014) Issues of methods and interpretation in the National Cancer Institute formaldehyde cohort study. Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, 9 (1).

[img]
Preview
PDF
Published Version
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (428kB) | Preview
[img] Plain Text (licence)
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (1kB)

Abstract

In 2004, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reclassified formaldehyde (FA) from a probable (Group 2A) to a known human carcinogen (Group 1) citing results for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) mortality from the follow-up through 1994 of the National Cancer Institute formaldehyde cohort study. To the contrary, in 2012, the Committee for Risk Assessment of the European Chemicals Agency disagreed with the proposal to classify FA as a known human carcinogen (Carc. 1A), proposing a lower but still protective category, namely as a substance which is presumed to have carcinogenic potential for humans (Carc. 1B). Thus, U.S. and European regulatory agencies currently disagree about the potential human carcinogenicity of FA. In 2013, the National Cancer Institute reported results from their follow-up through 2004 of the formaldehyde cohort and concluded that the results continue to suggest a link between FA exposure and NPC. We discuss in this commentary why we believe that this interpretation is neither consistent with the available data from the most recent update of the National Cancer Institute cohort study nor with other research findings from that cohort, other large cohort studies and the series of publications by some of the current authors, including an independent study of one of the National Cancer Institute's study plants. Another serious concern relates to the incorrectness of the data from the follow-up through 1994 of the National Cancer Institute study stemming from incomplete mortality ascertainment. While these data were corrected by the National Cancer Institute in subsequent supplemental publications, incorrect data from the original publications have been cited extensively in recent causal evaluations of FA, including IARC. We conclude that the NCI publications that contain incorrect data from the incomplete 1994 mortality follow-up should be retracted entirely or corrected via published errata in the corresponding journals, and efforts should be made to re-analyze data from the 2004 follow-up of the NCI cohort study. © 2014 Marsh et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Marsh, GMgmarsh@pitt.eduGMARSH
Morfeld, P
Collins, JJ
Symons, JM
Date: 16 May 2014
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology
Volume: 9
Number: 1
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1186/1745-6673-9-22
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Biostatistics
Refereed: Yes
Article Type: Review
Date Deposited: 16 Dec 2016 18:51
Last Modified: 02 Feb 2019 16:58
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/29561

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics

Altmetric.com


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item