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Genetic polymorphisms of epidermal growth factor in relation to risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: Two case-control studies

Yuan, JM and Fan, Y and Ognjanovic, S and Wang, R and Van Den Berg, D and Govindarajan, S and Yu, MC (2013) Genetic polymorphisms of epidermal growth factor in relation to risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: Two case-control studies. BMC Gastroenterology, 13 (1).

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Abstract

Background: Earlier, we reported a highly statistically significant association between T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokine genotypes and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk among natives of southern Guangxi, China, a hyperendemic region for HCC. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a critical role in malignant transformation of hepatocytes and tumor progression. A polymorphism in the EGF gene (61A > G) results in elevation of EGF in liver tissues and blood. Epidemiological data are sparse on the possible association between EGF genetic polymorphism and HCC risk. Methods: The EGF 61A > G polymorphism, multiple Th1 and Th2 genotypes, and environmental risk factors for HCC were determined on 117 HCC cases and 225 healthy control subjects among non-Asians of Los Angeles County, California, a low-risk population for HCC, and 250 HCC cases and 245 controls of southern Guangxi, China. Results: Following adjustment for all known or suspected HCC risk factors, non-Asians in Los Angeles who possessed at least one copy of the high activity 61*G allele of the EGF gene showed a statistically non-significant, 78% increased risk of HCC compared with those possessing the EGF A/A genotype. This EGF-HCC risk association significantly strengthened among heavy users of alcohol [odds ratio (OR) = 3.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.93-12.76, P = 0.065)], and among individuals carrying the high-risk Th1/Th2 genotypes for HCC (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.24-9.03, P = 0.017). No association between EGF genotype and HCC risk was observed among Chinese in southern Guangxi, China. Conclusion: Genetic polymorphism in the EGF gene resulting in elevated level of EGF, may contribute to HCC risk among low-risk non-Asians in Los Angeles. © 2013 Yuan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Yuan, JMyuanj@pitt.eduYUANJ
Fan, Y
Ognjanovic, S
Wang, Rrew59@pitt.eduREW59
Van Den Berg, D
Govindarajan, S
Yu, MC
Centers: Other Centers, Institutes, or Units > Pittsburgh Cancer Institute
Date: 18 February 2013
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Gastroenterology
Volume: 13
Number: 1
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1186/1471-230x-13-32
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2016 15:50
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2019 16:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/29756

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