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Hormonal modulation of connective tissue homeostasis and sex differences in risk for osteoarthritis of the knee

Boyan, BD and Hart, DA and Enoka, RM and Nicolella, DP and Resnick, E and Berkley, KJ and Sluka, KA and Kwoh, CK and Tosi, LL and O'Connor, MI and Coutts, RD and Kohrt, WM (2013) Hormonal modulation of connective tissue homeostasis and sex differences in risk for osteoarthritis of the knee. Biology of Sex Differences, 4 (1).

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Abstract

Young female athletes experience a higher incidence of ligament injuries than their male counterparts, females experience a higher incidence of joint hypermobility syndrome (a risk factor for osteoarthritis development), and post-menopausal females experience a higher prevalence of osteoarthritis than age-matched males. These observations indicate that fluctuating sex hormone levels in young females and loss of ovarian sex hormone production due to menopause likely contribute to observed sex differences in knee joint function and risk for loss of function. In studies of osteoarthritis, however, there is a general lack of appreciation for the heterogeneity of hormonal control in both women and men. Progress in this field is limited by the relatively few preclinical osteoarthritis models, and that most of the work with established models uses only male animals. To elucidate sex differences in osteoarthritis, it is important to examine sex hormone mechanisms in cells from knee tissues and the sexual dimorphism in the role of inflammation at the cell, tissue, and organ levels. There is a need to determine if the risk for loss of knee function and integrity in females is restricted to only the knee or if sex-specific changes in other tissues play a role. This paper discusses these gaps in knowledge and suggests remedies. © 2013 Boyan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


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Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Boyan, BD
Hart, DA
Enoka, RM
Nicolella, DP
Resnick, E
Berkley, KJ
Sluka, KA
Kwoh, CK
Tosi, LL
O'Connor, MI
Coutts, RD
Kohrt, WM
Centers: Other Centers, Institutes, or Units > Arthritis Institute
Date: 1 December 2013
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: Biology of Sex Differences
Volume: 4
Number: 1
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1186/2042-6410-4-3
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
School of Medicine > Immunology
Refereed: Yes
Article Type: Review
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2016 19:46
Last Modified: 13 Oct 2017 22:59
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/29764

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