Link to the University of Pittsburgh Homepage
Link to the University Library System Homepage Link to the Contact Us Form

Nursing home characteristics associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Burden and Transmission

Murphy, CR and Quan, V and Kim, D and Peterson, E and Whealon, M and Tan, G and Evans, K and Meyers, H and Cheung, M and Lee, BY and Mukamel, DB and Huang, SS (2012) Nursing home characteristics associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Burden and Transmission. BMC Infectious Diseases, 12.

[img]
Preview
PDF
Published Version
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (174kB) | Preview
[img] Plain Text (licence)
Available under License : See the attached license file.

Download (1kB)

Abstract

Background: MRSA prevalence in nursing homes often exceeds that in hospitals, but reasons for this are not well understood. We sought to measure MRSA burden in a large number of nursing homes and identify facility characteristics associated with high MRSA burden.Methods: We performed nasal swabs of residents from 26 nursing homes to measure MRSA importation and point prevalence, and estimate transmission. Using nursing home administrative data, we identified facility characteristics associated with MRSA point prevalence and estimated transmission risk in multivariate models.Results: We obtained 1,649 admission and 2,111 point prevalence swabs. Mean MRSA point prevalence was 24%, significantly higher than mean MRSA admission prevalence, 16%, (paired t-test, p<0.001), with a mean estimated MRSA transmission risk of 16%.In multivariate models, higher MRSA point prevalence was associated with higher admission prevalence (p=0.005) and higher proportions of residents with indwelling devices (p=0.01). Higher estimated MRSA transmission risk was associated with higher proportions of residents with diabetes (p=0.01) and lower levels of social engagement (p=0.03).Conclusions: MRSA importation was a strong predictor of MRSA prevalence, but MRSA burden and transmission were also associated with nursing homes caring for more residents with chronic illnesses or indwelling devices. Frequent social interaction among residents appeared to be protective of MRSA transmission, suggesting that residents healthy enough to engage in group activities do not incur substantial risks of MRSA from social contact. Identifying characteristics of nursing homes at risk for high MRSA burden and transmission may allow facilities to tailor infection control policies and interventions to mitigate MRSA spread. © 2012 Murphy et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Share

Citation/Export:
Social Networking:
Share |

Details

Item Type: Article
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Murphy, CR
Quan, V
Kim, D
Peterson, E
Whealon, M
Tan, G
Evans, K
Meyers, H
Cheung, M
Lee, BYbyl1@pitt.eduBYL1
Mukamel, DB
Huang, SS
Date: 24 October 2012
Date Type: Publication
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Infectious Diseases
Volume: 12
DOI or Unique Handle: 10.1186/1471-2334-12-269
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Epidemiology
School of Medicine > Biomedical Informatics
School of Medicine > Medicine
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 30 Nov 2016 17:22
Last Modified: 29 Jan 2019 15:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/29810

Metrics

Monthly Views for the past 3 years

Plum Analytics

Altmetric.com


Actions (login required)

View Item View Item