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Mass casualty triage: an in-depth analysis of various systems and their implications for future considerations

Gaul, Andrew (2016) Mass casualty triage: an in-depth analysis of various systems and their implications for future considerations. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Emergency medical triage is a necessary part of our healthcare world. The ability to sort, classify, and treat patients in a crisis is a skill that few perfect. In a disaster situation or mass casualty incident, the number of injured people can often overwhelm the ability of the local healthcare system to treat them. To help create efficient use and rationing of resources, emergency personnel use triage to assess, sort, and treat patients. Questions of public health importance immediately arise when discussing the implications of sorting patients based on their injuries in a crisis, and the triage system was created to answer these inquires. From the ideas of Napoleon’s Chief surgeon in the Imperial guard, triage has developed and changed immensely over the years. In this paper, I will analyze the historical development of emergency triage, analyze two major systems (START and SALT) used today in the U.S., discuss the problems and challenges of studying triage, analyze the literature surrounding the training of triage, and discuss the ethical implications associated with performing triage. Although triage algorithms alone are simple decision trees, the implications that accompany it create a multitude of problems for emergency personnel and those being treated. With this analysis, I will provide the evidence available on the systems and recommendations for the future of triage.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Gaul, Andrewang135@pitt.eduANG135
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairBarron, Geraldgbarron@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberMinster, Ryanrminster@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: December 2016
Date Type: Publication
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Health Policy & Management
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 23 May 2017 13:40
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2017 04:56
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/30400

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