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Genetic factors involved in substance use disorders with review of the rising opioid epidemic

Howard, Alec J. (2016) Genetic factors involved in substance use disorders with review of the rising opioid epidemic. Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

Substance use disorders comprise a significant public health burden. In a 2015 survey, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reported that 20.8 million people aged 12 or older had a substance use disorder in the past year. Healthcare expenditure for treatment in the U.S. was reported to cost $24.3 billon in 2009. Research has shown that genetic factors may contribute to the development and maintenance of these disorders. The additive effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms have been implicated. Epigenetic mechanisms involving microRNA, histone acetylation, and DNA methylation have been evidenced in association with chronic substance use. Further research is necessary to determine the details of underlying mechanisms of susceptibility to addiction. Utilizing evidence-based policy can have a substantial impact on public health outcomes. Concern over rising levels of opioid-related overdose death has warranted changes in health policy. This essay highlights health policy at the federal, state, and local level regarding the opioid epidemic.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Howard, Alec J.ajh132@pitt.eduAJH132
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairKammerer, Candacecmk3@pitt.educmk3UNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberMartinson, Jeremyjmartins@pitt.edujmartinsUNSPECIFIED
Date: 16 December 2016
Date Type: Publication
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Human Genetics
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 22 May 2017 20:54
Last Modified: 02 May 2019 14:55
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/30408

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