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Improving quality of intravenous (IV) products through the use of technology-assisted workflow systems (TAWF)

Jafari, Nilofar (2016) Improving quality of intravenous (IV) products through the use of technology-assisted workflow systems (TAWF). Master Essay, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

The intravenous (IV) room is a high risk area where sterile compounding errors can occur. Technology-assisted workflow (TAWF) systems were developed for use in the IV room to improve patient safety. Through the use of barcode scanning technology, TAWF systems intercept errors before the pharmacist verifies the final drug product. The technology also prioritizes the production of doses based on administration due time allowing for increased efficiency and reduction in waste volume. This project was designed to evaluate the errors, waste, and workflow efficiency at a tertiary care hospital pre-implementation of a TAWF system and post-implementation of a TAWF. In order to measure the TAWF system’s effect in preventing and reducing medication errors, medication occurrences from 2009, 2010, and 2011 were analyzed. To measure IV product waste, data from four quarterly two week audits that were conducted before the implementation of the TAWF and four quarterly two week audits that were conducted post implementation were analyzed. The staffing model was analyzed prior to the implementation of the TAWF and after the implementation to determine workflow efficiency. There was a 93% decrease in errors associated with IV production post-implementation of the TAWF. Comparing the pre and post TAWF implementation data, there was a decrease of 10,836 IVs wasted per year equating to a decrease of 0.31 full-time equivalents (FTEs). Due to the increased efficiency of automation and the decreased FTEs needed to staff the IV room, only one full-time pharmacist and two full-time technicians on both the day and evening shifts were needed as opposed to two and three, respectively. Conclusion/Public Health Significance: Sterile compounding is a significant component of pharmacy practice that is in need of improvement. There are a variety of factors that have led to fatal errors including lack of standardization of practice, inadequate IV room training, and a lax safety culture. To counteract the errors that can occur during sterile compounding, TAWF can be utilized and have shown to have a benefit in safety, waste reduction, and efficiency.


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Details

Item Type: Other Thesis, Dissertation, or Long Paper (Master Essay)
Status: Unpublished
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Jafari, Nilofarnij19@pitt.eduNIJ19
Contributors:
ContributionContributors NameEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Committee ChairFinegold, Daviddnf@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Committee MemberCastle, Nicholascastlen@pitt.eduUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Date: 14 December 2016
Date Type: Publication
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: Graduate School of Public Health > Multidisciplinary MPH
Degree: MPH - Master of Public Health
Thesis Type: Master Essay
Refereed: Yes
Date Deposited: 23 May 2017 13:48
Last Modified: 25 Aug 2017 04:56
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/30562

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