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BRAIN SYSTEM MECHANISMS UNDERLYING DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN WORKING MEMORY PERFORMANCE DURING ADOLESCENCE

Montez, David (2017) BRAIN SYSTEM MECHANISMS UNDERLYING DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN WORKING MEMORY PERFORMANCE DURING ADOLESCENCE. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh.

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Abstract

BRAIN SYSTEM MECHANISMS UNDERLYING DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN WORKING MEMORY PEFORMANCE DURING ADOLESCENCE
David F. Montez, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh, 2016

Working memory is a critical component of executive function that continues to develop during adolescence. In addition to developmental improvements in mean performance, there are significant decreases in behavioral variability. The neural underpinnings of developmental changes in behavioral variability are poorly understood although they would provide important insight into the nature of improvements in working memory. This dissertation takes a multilevel approach, applying whole-brain fMRI analyses and computational modeling to a longitudinal data set acquired from a cohort of 8-30 year olds as they performed a memory guided saccade task.
First, we delineate behavioral changes in trial-to-trial in performance variability and explore these changes within a drift diffusion framework. We find that a trial-to-trial variations in gain and response thresholds accounts for features of behavioral instability. Second, we establish that trial-to-trial behavioral variability is associated with fluctuations in the expression of whole brain patterns of task-related BOLD signal, or brain state variability, which is a predicted consequence of widespread gain modulation. We find that individual trajectories of developmentally stabilizing behavior are predicted by changes in brain state variability. Third, in order to explore reports of a relationship between the complexity of neural activity and behavioral stability, we characterize developmental increases in BOLD complexity in a task context and assess their relationship to developmental changes in behavior. Collectively, our findings provide novel evidence that the age-related stabilization of behavioral performance is driven by the stabilization of widespread gain signals across development.


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Details

Item Type: University of Pittsburgh ETD
Status: Published
Creators/Authors:
CreatorsEmailPitt UsernameORCID
Montez, Daviddfm11@pitt.edudfm111
ETD Committee:
TitleMemberEmail AddressPitt UsernameORCID
Thesis AdvisorLuna, Beatrizlunab@upmc.edu
Committee ChairFiez, Juliefiez@pitt.edu
Committee MemberOlson, Carlcolson@cnbc.cmu.edu
Committee MemberErickson, Kirkkiericks@pitt.edu
Committee MemberTeichert, Tobiastobias.tshirt@gmail.com
Committee MemberHallquist, Michaelmichael.hallquist@gmail.com
Committee MemberTimothy, Verstynentimothyv@andrew.cmu.edu
Date: 27 February 2017
Date Type: Publication
Defense Date: 28 November 2016
Approval Date: 27 February 2017
Submission Date: 2 December 2016
Access Restriction: No restriction; Release the ETD for access worldwide immediately.
Number of Pages: 109
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Schools and Programs: School of Medicine > Neurobiology
Degree: PhD - Doctor of Philosophy
Thesis Type: Doctoral Dissertation
Refereed: Yes
Uncontrolled Keywords: adolescence brain state development working memory
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2017 18:41
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2017 06:15
URI: http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/id/eprint/30655

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  • BRAIN SYSTEM MECHANISMS UNDERLYING DEVELOPMENTAL CHANGES IN WORKING MEMORY PERFORMANCE DURING ADOLESCENCE. (deposited 27 Feb 2017 18:41) [Currently Displayed]

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